Author Archives: Bethany Marx

356 Costume Design

Costume Design Syllabus 

1. Course Information

Course #/Name: Theater 356-Costume Design                     CRN: 78304

Location: Costume Shop-107 FAC       Credit Hours: 3            Time: TT 11:30-1:00

 

2. Instructor Information

Bethany Marx, Asst. Professor           Office: FAC 105B    Office Phone: 474-5365

Email: bmarx2@alaska.edu    Office Hours: Monday 3:30-4:30, Wednesday 12:00-2:00 or by appt.

 

3. Course Readings/Materials

Textbooks:

The Magic Garment-Principles of Costume Design by Rebecca Cunningham

ISBN 13: 978-1-57766-408-6

Supplies:

Sketchpad, at least 9×12, preferably 11×14

Drawing pencils, at least two

Hand pencil sharpener

Kneaded eraser

Watercolor or art paper for renderings

Colored pencils

Watercolor or acrylic paints

Several good quality round paint brushes, at least one large and one small

Palate or disposable plastic plates, water cup and hand towel

Students should have access to a color printer.

 

4. Course Description

Through a series of design projects, play readings and drawing exercises, students learn how to successfully analyze text, communicate production concepts and visually express costume ideas using sketching, rendering and collage. Projects also introduce students to the practical skills needed to realize a costume design within the limits of a theatre’s resources and needs.

 

5. Course Goals

Students leave the class with an understanding of the roles and duties performed by a professional costume designer, and how these roles differ in a University or community theatre setting.

Students are able to read and evaluate a script for costume details, develop a concept and coherently explain and defend production choices.

Students know where to look to find fundamental period and contemporary costume research, and how to identify legitimate primary sources.

Students can to express their costume ideas visually through drawing, painting and/or collage, using a wide variety of design elements to convey character and plot details.

Students can demonstrate the appropriate organization skills required of a costume designer, including paperwork, budgeting skills and supply requisition.

 

6. Student Learning Outcomes

Improve students’ ability to express their ideas visually, through drawing exercises and design projects.

Learn how to read a play specifically for costume information and gather that information into a cohesive concept supported by the script.

Improve writing and communication skills.

Study the methods and techniques used to locate research for a play and make specific choices with regard to character, plot, location and other script information.

Locate research from a specific time period, and understand the difference between primary, secondary and non-traditional research.

Practice rendering in both dry and wet media.

Design diverse plays, practicing various types of stylization, realism and the suspension of disbelief.

 

7. Instructional Methods/Assignments

This course is taught as a combination of lecture, studio and group discussion. Students will complete projects in and out of class, which will be presented to and discussed by peers.

Drawing Assignments

In addition to in-class exercises, students will complete several out-of-class drawing assignments. Students will show instructor that assignments have been completed throughout the semester, but will only turn it in for a grade on the last day of class.

Text Analysis Project

Students will read the assigned play and come up with a concept for the production and create a costume breakdown for the play, including important details mentioned in the script. These details include time of day, weather, season, class/economic status of characters, colors or costume props mentioned, costume gimmicks, and quick changes. The list should include page numbers, character(s) if applicable, quotes from the text, and personal notes.

Modern Research Project

Students will read a short, modern script and create costume collages for two characters. Use magazine pictures, research photocopies, online printouts, fabric swatches and/or mixed media. Collages and sketches should be accompanied by a one to two page paper explaining their concept and design choices. Students who feel comfortable drawing may include pencil sketches to illustrate their meaning as well.

Period Research and Sketches

Students will create a concept for a play in a time period prior to 1900. Primary and color research will accompany pencil sketches for four diverse characters.

For Colored Girls Colored Pencil Renderings-Students will do research and create colored pencil renderings for three women from the choreopoem “For Colored Girls…” focusing on how body type, silhouette and style can communicate character when color is predetermined. Designing for a script with predetermined elements encourages beginning designers to explore more difficult design elements.

Twins Design Project-Students will read, summarize, create a concept and research ideas for a production of Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare and then sketch and render their designs for the “twins,” Viola (as Cessario) and Sebastian in such a way that they are both identical and yet identifiable. Renderings will be painted and include labels and backgrounds.

Short Film Design Project-Students will read and create a concept and several simple renderings for a short screenplay, while learning the differences between design for stage and film.

Final Costume Design Project with Makeup, Mask or Headdress Design-Each student will be assigned a different children’s play from the list below and asked to complete six final color renderings that include either a makeup, mask or headdress designs for at least four of the characters. Students will also turn in a concept statement and all the related research and paperwork. Pencil sketches will be due before the final project and one-on-one meetings will be held with each student to discuss ideas and assess progress before the final renderings are due.

 

8. Tentative Course Calendar/Class Topics

9/1 Explanation of the Syllabus. Assignments: Acquire supplies and textbook. Read Chapter 1:

Understanding Stage Costumes.

9/6 Beginning drawing assignments. Methods of observation. Sketchbook assignment.

9/8 Introduction to design. Tasks of a costume designer. Read PAGES 37-48 of Chapter 2:

Understanding the Play and Gum for 9/15.

9/13 Drawing the human form part one: women. Sketchbook assignment.

9/15 Talk about plays and character breakdown/paperwork. Be prepared to talk about Gum.

Text Analysis project due Thursday 9/22.

9/20 Drawing the human form, part two: men. Sketchbook assignment.

9/22 Text Analysis Project presentation. Modern research. Read Chapter 3: Doing Research

and Short Modern Play for 9/29.

9/27 Drawing the human form, part three: plus sizes and children. Sketchbook assignment.

9/29 Research methods for contemporary clothing. Internet sources, magazines, catalogs.

Complete Modern Research project for 10/4.

10/4 Present Modern Research project. Costume History in a Week!

10/6 Costume History continued. How to identify periods of dress. Selecting the period

appropriate for your show. Assign Period Research Project, due 10/18.

10/11 Drawing the human form, part four: details. Hands, feet, faces. Sketchbook assignment.

10/13 Elements of Design. Read Chapter 5 PAGES 121-134 and For Colored Girls for 10/20.

10/18 Period Research Project due. Drawing the human form, part five: alternative poses. Sketchbook assignment.

10/20 Assign For Colored Girls project, due 11/1.  Discuss fabric types and selection.

Read Chapter 5 PAGES 135-146.

10/25 Using Color Media: Colored pencil, paper and fabric swatching. How light affects color.

Sketchbook assignment.

10/27 Creating a piece list and planning a budget. Designing for Special Circumstances:

Children, Outdoor Theatre, Long Run productions, etc.

11/1 Present For Colored Girls projects. Emphasis on discussing rendering choices with the

director.

11/3 Drawing the human form, part six: period silhouette. Sketchbook assignment.

Read Chapter 6: Rendering the Sketch PAGES 172-182.

11/8 Using Wet Media. How to paint different fabrics and textures. Sketchbook Assignment.

11/10 Read Twelfth Night and assign Twins Design Project, due 11/22.

11/15 Construction Details. Planning for Quick Changes. Pulling and buying costumes. Read

short film script for 11/22.

11/17 Other Skills Needed by a Costume Designer: Dyeing, distressing, measurements, basic

alterations, shopping and pulling lists.

11/22 Present Twins Design Project. Discuss film script. (Guest lecture by Maya?) Assign film

project, due 12/1.

11/24 Thanksgiving. No Class.

11/29 Drawing details: Masks, makeup, hairstyles, jewelry, tattoos. Sketchbook assignment.

12/1 Present film project. Assign final design project.

12/6 Sketchbook due. Discuss fittings, dress rehearsals, costume parades and strike.

12/8 Bring sketches/research/concept for final design project to be discussed with Beth

individually.

Final December 15, 10:15 am: Present Final Design Project to class

9. Course Policies

Attendance

Attendance is required EVERY DAY. This is a hands-on class and you need to participate to learn. I know everyone has an occasional “brain lapse,” so students will be granted two excused absences in the semester. Any further absences will count against your final grade (see grading below). “Life events” such as weddings may be excused if consent is obtained prior to the event and an effort is made to promptly reschedule and make up missed work.

If you become ill or have a personal or family emergency, such as a funeral, please contact me prior to the start of class and bring a doctor’s slip, obituary or note. If you have doubts about whether something is considered excusable, please talk to me sooner rather than later. Excusing students from class for any reason will remain up to the discretion of the instructor.

Cheating=Bad. Learning=Good.

Don’t copy, don’t cheat, don’t trace. Don’t have someone draw for you. Don’t steal a design concept from some production you saw before I moved up here. The writing assignments for this course are limited, but remember that plagiarism—the copying of another person’s writing OR IDEAS and calling them your own—is a SERIOUS offense. Students caught cheating or plagiarizing will lose all of the points for that assignment. A second offense is cause for failure from the class. There are lots of ideas out there. Use your own.

Also, please treat your instructor, the shop manager, the equipment and your fellow students with respect. Hurtful, racist or derogatory comments, excessive use of inappropriate language, physical violence and improper use of or vandalism of university equipment will not be tolerated. (Please refer to the UAF Catalog Academics and Regulations under Student Code of Conduct for more information on the University’s policies regarding student behavior. I am very serious about this.)

Research

When researching for your costume design projects, it is important to use as much primary research as possible. In other words, pictures or paintings of actual people and animals from the time period. Pictures of other people’s costumes or makeup, including images from plays/movies and illustrations from costume history books, are not appropriate research in most cases.

Blackboard/Email

All information included on this syllabus, detailed assignment instructions and up-to-date grades will be available on Blackboard at classes.uaf.edu within the first few weeks of the semester. Emails will be automatically sent out to remind you of major deadlines; however, failure to receive a reminder email is not an accepted excuse for late work. All due dates are printed in this syllabus under the tentative weekly schedule. If you do not regularly check your university email address, you may wish to set up forwarding to an address you check frequently.

10. Grading/Evaluation

points                                      total                 % of total grade

Drawing assignments             4 per drawing                         40                    ~9%

Text Analysis Project                                                               40                    ~9%

Modern Research Project                                                       50                    ~11%

Period Research and Sketches                                                60                    ~13%

For Colored Girls Project                                                        60                    ~13%

Twins Rendering Project                                                         60                    ~13%

Short Film Design Project                                                       40                    ~9%

Final Costume Design Project                                                 100                  ~23%

Total Points Possible: 450

 

Absences-For each unexcused day you miss you will automatically lose points regardless of whether you make up the work. The first day you miss will cost you 10 points, or 2.5% of your grade. The next day will cost you 15 points, and each day after that will cost you 20 more. If you arrive more than five minutes after the start of class, you will be counted late. Three lates equals one absence.

Late Assignments- Each late assignment will be downgraded 5% each day and will not be accepted beyond one week after due date unless ok-ed by instructor. Students will be granted a 48 hour grace period on first late assignment only (not including drawing assignments).

A 90-100%       B 80-90%         C 70-80%         D 60-70%    Failing is below 60 percent

 

11. Support Services

Students struggling with writing assignments may visit the Writing Center in 801 Gruening for assistance. Writing Center hours and other helpful tips are posted on the English Department website at http://www.alaska.edu/english/studentresources/writing/.

 

12. Disabilities

I am happy to work with the Office of Disabilities Services (208 WHIT, 474-5655) to provide reasonable accommodation to students with disabilities. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office and provide a letter of accommodation within three weeks of the start of class. Accommodations received after three weeks will not be backdated.

254: Beginning Costume Construction

Theater 254: Beginning Costume Construction Syllabus

1. Course Information

Course Number: THR 254      Title: Beginning Costume Construction

Time: MWF 2:15p-3:15p        Location: Costume Shop-107 FAC          Credit Hours: 3

 

2. Instructor

Bethany Marx, Asst. Professor           Office: FAC 109B    Office Phone: 474-5365

Email: bmarx2@alaska.edu    Office Hours: Mon 3:30-4:30, Thurs 2:00-4:00 or by appointment

 

3. Course Readings/ Materials

Textbook: The Costume Technician’s Handbook by Rosemary Ingham and Liz Covey

ISBN 0-435-08610-3

 

Supplies:

2 yards of muslin or plain cotton fabric in unobtrusive color

A small spool of hand sewing thread (Gutterman recommended)

One medium-large hook and eye/loop set (Sold in multiples.You may want to share with classmates.)

One skirt hook and bar (Again, sold in multiples.)

Small binder, slipcover or folder equipped to hold 3-hole punched paper. Doesn’t have to be new

3 yards of woven cotton or flannel fashion fabric, pre-washed

½ yard or more of contrasting fabric, also pre-washed*

Small shirt button, ½ inch or smaller (Sold in multiples. You may want to share with classmates.)

½ or ¾ inch wide elastic to fit waist

Paint or decorations for your leather mask (leather provided)

*contrast should be lighter in color or equivalent to fashion fabric or pockets/seams may shadow through. To test, hold up contrast behind main fabric.

 

Optional Supplies:

A good pair of sewing scissors

Colored marking pencils

A clear, 2”x18” ruler

A tape measure

Pins, hand sewing needles or other sewing supplies

 

4. Course Description

Introduction to basic methods of construction used by professional shops and costume houses to create theatrical costumes. Students will complete several projects, covering hand and machine sewing, cutting, fabric identification, simple alterations and costume crafts. Class also includes lectures on shop organization, job positions and policies.

 

5. Course Goals

Students can identify and execute common hand sewing stitches, and know the proper situation in which to use them.

Students are able to thread and operate a sewing machine with accuracy, following straight lines and curves, and starting and stopping at exact points.

Students can interpret pattern markings and instructions to properly cut out a garment.

Students are familiar basic construction methods, including pinning, stitching and pressing.

Students can envision the construction of a basic garment from the pattern pieces through observing the pattern markings and garment illustrations.

 

6. Student Learning Outcomes

Learn a selection of common stitching techniques by completing samplers, which can be referenced in the future when the skills are required.

Name the parts of a sewing machine and identify them on different makes and models.

Be able to rethread a sewing machine with speed and accuracy, including filling an empty bobbin.

Diagnose simple problems that may be preventing the sewing machine from functioning.

Take measurements of another person and apply them to the following: identifying whether an existing pattern will fit, measuring an existing pattern, completing a basic pattern drafting (sloper).

Visually identify common fabric weaves and fiber contents.

Use a burn test to determine the fiber content of an unmarked fabric.

 

7. Instructional Methods

This course is taught as a combination of lecture and studio.

 

Sewing Samplers

Students will complete samples of common hand and machine sewing techniques, hardware and closures. Samples should be firmly stapled to the appropriate worksheet and submitted in a binder or folder.

Practicum

Students will complete 20 hours of time in the costume shop working on actual shows or stock repairs. Students receive two points per hour.

Sloper Pattern and Construction

Students will take accurate measurements in class and draft a sloper for themselves, marking and truing the pattern. The sloper will then be constructed out of muslin and checked for fit accuracy.

Dye Project

Students will be instructed on using dye equipment and be asked to attempt to match a provided color sample.

Pajama Pant Construction Project

Each student will follow provided instructions to mark, cut and build a pair of pajama pants in his or her size, or for a friend or family member. Details include contrasting side seam pockets, waistband lining and rear patch pocket; top stitched button fly and elastic waist. Students will fit each other to mark desired hems. Grading will be based on functional completion of project, care in following instructions, attention to detail and effort.

Leather Mask Making

Students will be taught techniques to cut and shape a simple leather mask.

Final Exam

The written Final Exam will test terminology and practical skills learned throughout the semester.

8. Tentative Course Calendar (Please note: this is an example syllabus.  This schedule is not correct for your class.)

8/31 Introductions, talk through syllabus/supplies. Introduction to the Costume Shop, basic fabric/material terminology.

Assignment: Acquire supplies for class.

9/3 No Class

9/5 Begin hand sewing samplers.

9/7 Continue hand sewing samplers. Finish at home.

9/10  Introduction to the sewing machine. Threading the machine and bobbin, filling a bobbin. Introduction to the serger. Machine practice exercises

9/12 Basic machine skills. Begin machine samplers

9/14 Work on machine samplers.

9/17 Begin hardware: Zippers

9/19 Begin hand-sewn hardware including buttons, snaps, hooks

9/21 Continue hardware

9/24Machine made buttonholes

9/26 Last day to work on samplers in class

9/28 Taking measurements. Measuring a patterns. Measuring a dress form.

10/1 Sewing Samplers DUE. Explain basic drafting techniques. Draping vs. Drafting Demonstrate dart manipulation

10/3 Begin sloper drafting

10/5 Continue sloper drafting

10/8 Explain basics of cutting/cutting terminology. Cut sloper patterns out of muslin

10/10 Finish cutting and stitching. Fitting demonstration in class

10/12 Last day for slopers in class. Lecture on pattern alterations and truing.

10/15 Sloper project DUE. Demonstrate dyeing techniques. Short lecture on color theory and safety.

10/17 Work on dying projects in class.

10/19 Refresh cutting and layout instructions. Explain pattern pieces.

10/22 Half class begin cutting. Other half excused unless dye project unfinished.

10/24 Other half class cutting

10/26 Finish cutting, begin serging PJ pants. Dye Project DUE.

10/29 Continue serging/sewing.

10/31 Happy Halloween! Extra credit if you wear a costume to class (provided you can still work in it). Pajama pant construction: Build and attach fly.

11/2 Pajama pant construction: Begin side seam pockets.

11/5 Pajama pant construction: Finish side seam pockets.

11/7 Pajama pant construction: Make back patch pocket

11/9 Pajama pant construction: Attach back patch pocket

11/12 Pajama pant construction: Refresh memory on buttonholes. Practice buttonholes.

11/14 Pajama pant construction: Stitch buttonhole in fly. Cut open. Stitch on button.

11/16 Pajama pant construction: Make waistband. Attach waistband.

11/19 Pajama pant construction: Stitch side seams and crotch seams.

11/21 Pajama pant construction: Finish seams.

11/23 Thanksgiving Break. No class

11/26 Pajama pant construction: Fit elastic and mark hem. Finish pants.

11/28 Leather mask demo

11/30 Design leather masks, cut leather

12/3 Pajama pants DUE. Wet mount masks and leave to dry until Wednesday.

12/5 Paint and decorate masks, add ties

12/7 Mask DUE. Final lecture on costume shops in the real world. Final Exam review.

12/10 Final Exam

Practicum Hours DUE by end of scheduled exam period, Friday Dec, 14 at 3 p.m.

 

9. Course Policies

Attendance

Attendance is required EVERY DAY. This is a hands-on class and you need to participate to learn. I know everyone has an occasional “brain lapse,” so students will be granted two excused absences in the semester. Any further absences will count against your final grade (see grading below). “Life events” such as weddings may be excused if consent is obtained prior to the event and an effort is made to promptly reschedule and make up missed work.

If you become ill or have a personal or family emergency, such as a funeral, please contact me prior to the start of class and bring a doctor’s slip, obituary or note. If you have doubts about whether something is considered excusable, please talk to me sooner rather than later. Excusing students from class for any reason will remain up to the discretion of the instructor.

Cheating=Bad. Learning=Good.

It is difficult to cheat in this course, as most of the work will be completed in the presence of the instructor. However, as they say, where there’s a will, there’s a way. So, if I catch you cheating, or you work doesn’t look like yours, you’ll lose all the points for the assignment. A second offense will result in failure of the course.

Also, please treat your instructor, the shop manager, the equipment and your fellow students with respect. Hurtful, racist or derogatory comments, excessive use of inappropriate language, physical violence and improper use or vandalism of university equipment will not be tolerated. Please see the instructor if any class activity or your classmates are making you uncomfortable so we can address the issue promptly. (Please refer to the UAF Catalog Academics and Regulations under Student Code of Conduct for more information on the University’s policies regarding student behavior. I am very serious about this.)

Blackboard/Email

All information included on this syllabus, detailed assignment instructions and up-to-date grades will be available on Blackboard at classes.uaf.edu within the first few weeks of the semester. Emails will be automatically sent out to remind you of major deadlines; however, failure to receive a reminder email is not an accepted excuse for late work. All due dates are printed in this syllabus under the tentative weekly schedule. If you do not regularly check your university email address, you may wish to set up forwarding to an address you check frequently.

10. Grading/Evaluation

points                    % of total grade

Sewing Samplers                     60                                15%

Practicum                                40                                10%

Sloper                                      60                                15%

Dye Project                             40                                10%

Pajama Pants                           100                              25%

Leather Mask                          40                                10%

Final Exam                              60                                15%

Total:               400

Attendance is mandatory. Rather than earning points for being in class, you will lose points from your final total grade if you miss. For each unexcused day you miss you will automatically lose points regardless of whether you make up the work. The first day you miss will cost you 10 points, the next day will cost you 15 points, and each day after that will cost you 20 more. 20 points is 5% of your final grade!

Late assignments will be downgraded 5% each day and will not be accepted beyond one week after due date unless ok-ed by instructor. Students will be granted a 48 hour grace period on first late assignment only.

A+ 97-100%                     B+ 87-89%                        C+ 77-79%                     D+ 65-70%

A 93-96%                          B 83-86%                          C 73-76%                       D 60-64%

A-90-92%                         B- 80-82%                         C- 70-72%                      D- 58-59%

Failing is below 58 percent

11. Support Services

If you are having problems with any part of this course, please contact the instructor.

12. Disability Services

I will be glad to work with the Office of Disabilities Services (208 WHIT, 474-5655) to provide reasonable accommodation to students with disabilities. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office and provide a letter of accommodation within three weeks of the start of class.

354 Intermediate Costume Construction

THR 354    3 Credits    As Demand Warrants
Intermediate Costume Construction (2+3) h
This course is intended to improve students’ sewing and patterning skills through a series of exercises and advanced projects. Students will be asked to construct costumes and mockups, create and alter basic patterns, manipulate sloper patterns and alter existing costumes. The final project will be designed and constructed by the student. (Prerequisites: THR F254 or demonstrated sewing experience and instructor permission. Recommended: Theatre Practicum or Work Study in the Costume Shop.)

Intermediate Costume Construction Syllabus

1. Course Information

Course #/Title: THR 354- Intermediate Costume Construction     CRN: TBD

Time: TBD                                              Location: Costume Shop FAC 107                        Credit Hours: 3

2. Instructor

Name: Bethany Marx, Asst. Professor                Office: FAC 105B               Office phone: 474-5365

Email: bmarx2@alaska.edu      Office Hours: Wed 1:00-2:00, Thurs 3:30-5:00 or by appointment

PLEASE TAKE NOTE: This is an advanced class that builds off of the skill set acquired during THR 254: Beginning Costume Construction. Students who received poor grades in Beginning Costuming or students who have not taken THR 254 from the current instructor may have difficulty completing this course.

3. Course Readings/Materials

Textbook: The Costume Technician’s Handbook by Rosemary Ingham and Liz Covey

ISBN 0-435-08610-3

Required Supplies :

  • 3 yards of muslin or cotton broadcloth in an unobtrusive color
  • ½ yard of gingham fabric (¼”- ½” squares) in a low contrast color (light blue, yellow, pink, not red or navy)
  • A small binder or folder which can hold 3-punched papers (can be old/used)
  • Supplies to construct a final design project of your choosing (list provided later)

Students who wish to keep their men’s period (pirate) shirt must also purchase 3 ½ yards of shirting material (lightweight, non-stretch fabric , ideally cotton or linen). Students who wish to donate their shirt to the costume shop may construct it out of shop provided fabrics. Please inform me ahead of time which you intend to do, so I have materials available as needed.

You may also choose to (and I recommend that you do) purchase the following:

  • A good pair of fabric scissors
  • Paper scissors
  • A clear 2” wide ruler
  • A dressmakers curve
  • Push pins
  • Straight pins of your preferred style
  • A pin cushion (magnetic or traditional)
  • All students are welcome to use the scissors/rulers/pins in the costume shop.

4. Course Description

This course is intended to improve students sewing and patterning skills through a series of exercises and advanced projects.  Students will be asked to construct costumes and mockups, create and alter basic patterns, manipulate sloper patterns and alter existing costumes. The final project will be designed and constructed by the student.  Methods taught in this class are those commonly used in professional costume shops throughout the United States and Canada.

5. Course Goals

Students are thoroughly comfortable with shop equipment, including sewing machines, sergers and industrial irons.

Students are able to cut and construct accurately, following universal pattern markings without assistance from the instructor.

Students comprehend and can replicate basic draping, transferring and truing methods to create new patterns made to fit a specific form.

Students can follow written and verbal instructions to complete more difficult projects.

Students are familiar with common costume shop terminology and know when and how to ask questions pertinent to their project.

6. Student Learning Outcomes

Complete difficult sewing techniques such as pleating, felling and blind hemming.

Use seam variations for appropriate projects.

Replace a broken zipper or button in an existing garment, matching the techniques used by the manufacturer.

Repair and alter an existing garment discreetly.

Create bias tape and piping from regular fabrics.

Make alterations to a paper pattern based on a set of measurements and  “true” the seams accurately.

Understand the difference between commercial patterns and shop made patterns and how to use both.

7. Instructional Methods/Assignments

This course is taught in a combination of lecture and studio. Students will learn and practice while completing the following projects.

 Advanced Sewing Samplers-Similar to those required for Beginning Costuming, students must complete the following ten samples of advanced skills: Shirt tail hem, French seam, felled seam, offset zipper, bias tape, piping/piped seam, hand blind hem, machine blind hem, double welt pocket and one inch knife pleats

Men’s Period Shirt-To practice sewing accuracy and refresh memory, students will cut and construct a pirate/peasant shirt. Students may choose to make the shirt to fit themselves or make a shirt to donate to UAF costume stock. If you make the shirt for yourself, you must provide the fabric.

Corset Pattern Adjustment and Mockup-Students will transfer an existing corset pattern to brown paper, remove any manufacturers seam allowance, and adjust the pattern to fit themselves or another student, friend or family member. (If the person is not taking the class, they must be available to come in during class on the mock-up fitting day.) Students will then cut and construct a muslin mockup, adjust fit on the body and alter the original pattern after the fitting.

Draping Project-Students will drape a basic sleeveless bodice (women) or vest/doublet (men) with very simple neck and waistline on one of the shop dress forms. Students will then transfer this garment to brown paper, mark grain lines, label and true the pattern. Students will trade projects and construct a mockup from someone else’s pattern.

Alteration Project– Students will take part in a mock fitting with another student and costume pieces from UAF stock . Alterations will be pinned and marked in the fitting and completed by the student. The student will take before and after photos.

Final Construction Project-Students will create sketches and submit proposals for their chosen final construction project. Keep in mind the following:

The project should consist of one costume item. You may choose to design a larger outfit but select one piece to be constructed and graded for class. I want you to make one thing very, very well.

You will have to purchase all of the supplies yourself. Fabric can be very expensive. Design something you can afford to build.

Project must be reasonably difficult, without being too difficult to construct with the skills you’ve already obtained. Capes, cloaks, ponchos, peasant blouses, etc. do not utilize enough advanced skills. Suit coats and structured jackets require skills you do not have.

Project must be fitted. Please do not propose things made of stretch fabric or extremely loose. Garment must be made to fit you or a person that can be brought in to class at the end of the semester.  You will be graded on whether your project fits.

If you plan to use a commercial pattern for your project, you will be required to transfer it to brown paper, remove the seam allowance and true the pattern. Leave time for this.

Suggestions for projects:

Build a corset from your corset pattern. Must be fully boned, top and bottom finished with piping, and have grommetted or buttonhole lace-up closure. Decorated as preferred.

Drape and build a sleeveless fashion top to fit yourself or someone you know. Must be fully lined, and include zipper, grommets or button closures. Turn in draping, pattern and final top.

Alter your draping project from class to build a period bodice, waistcoat or doublet with closures, advanced seaming, peplum, wings, pockets and/or pocket flaps. Simple tie-on sleeve optional.

Build a men’s button-down dress or western shirt with breast pockets and decorative accents.

8. Tentative Schedule/Class Topics

Week 1

Introductions, Syllabus. Review of basic construction, sewing machines, serger, etc. Begin Samplers

Work on Sewing Samplers in class

Week 2

Finish Sewing Samplers in/out of class.

Week 3

Review cutting techniques, cut period shirts and begin construction

Construct period shirts in class

Week 4

Continue period shirts

Week 5

Period shirts due.

Lecture on pattern transfer, alterations and truing. Begin corset pattern adjustment.

Week 6

Finish corset pattern.

Start cutting corset mockup.

Week 7

Finish cutting. Construct corset mockup.

Finish and fit corset mockup.

Week 8

Alter corset pattern after mockup.

Demonstration of draping and truing. Begin draping project.

Final Construction Proposals due. (Two ideas, note which you prefer.)

Week 9

Finish draping on form. Begin transfer to paper pattern.

Complete paper pattern. Label and notch. Exchange with classmate.

Final Construction Proposals returned. Make shopping lists/yardage est. Students must purchase supplies for final project by Week 11

Week 10

Cut draping mockups, begin construction.

Continue with draping mockups.

Week 11

Draping Mockups due. Begin Alterations project with class fittings.

Alter garments in class.

Week 12-14

Final Construction Project. Due during final exam period.

9. Course Policies

Attendance

Attendance is required EVERY DAY. This is a small, hands-on class and you need to participate to learn. I know everyone has an occasional “brain lapse,” so students will be granted two excused absences in the semester. Any further absences will count against your final grade (see grading below). “Life events” such as weddings may be excused if consent is obtained prior to the event and an effort is made to promptly reschedule and make up missed work.

Students may be excused at the discretion of the instructor for illness, family emergency or life event ONLY if the absence is cleared IN ADVANCE.[*] I will not back down on this. If I do not have a phone call or email from you by 5:30 the day of class, you are unexcused. Documented proof, such as a doctor’s note, hospital bill or obituary may be required to obtain an excused absence.

It is the responsibility of the student to inquire about and make up missed work if he or she is absent. Students who are consistently late will be penalized at the discretion of the professor.

Cheating=Bad. Learning=Good.

It is difficult to cheat in this course, as most of the work will be completed in the presence of the instructor. However, as they say, where there’s a will, there’s a way. So, if I catch you cheating, or you work doesn’t look like yours, you’ll lose all the points for the assignment.

Also, please treat your instructor, the shop manager, the equipment and your fellow students with respect. Hurtful, racist or derogatory comments, excessive use of inappropriate language, physical violence and improper use or vandalism of university equipment will not be tolerated. Please see the instructor if any class activity or your classmates are making you uncomfortable so we can address the issue promptly. (Please refer to the UAF Catalog Academics and Regulations under Student Code of Conduct for more information on the University’s policies regarding student behavior. I am very serious about this.)

Blackboard

All information included on this syllabus, detailed assignment instructions and up-to-date grades will be available on Blackboard at classes.uaf.edu within the first few weeks of the semester.

10. Evaluation/Grading

Project                                                                                                 Points                   Percent of Grade

Sewing Samplers (Ten, 3-5 points each)                                 40                           ~9%

Period Shirt                                                                                        60                           ~13%

Corset Pattern and Mockup                                                        80                           ~18%

Draping Project. Pattern and Mockup                                     80                           ~18%

Final Project Proposal                                                                    20                           ~4%

Alteration Project                                                                            50                           ~11%

Final Construction Project                                                            120                         ~27%

Total:    450                         (~ means approximately)

A+ 97-100%        B+ 87-89%           C+ 77-79%           D+ 65-70%

A 93-96%             B 83-86%              C 73-76%              D 60-64%    Failing is below 58 percent

A-90-92%             B- 80-82%            C- 70-72%            D- 58-59%

**Late Assignments will be docked one letter grade (B becomes a B-) for each day they are late and will not be accepted after one week. Design assignments that must be presented in class will not be accepted after the due date unless prior consent is obtained.

You have two excused absences, no questions asked. Following these, your first absence will cost you 10 points, the second 15 points and each subsequent absence an additional 20 points. IT IS VERY EASY TO LOSE SEVERAL LETTER GRADES OR EVEN FAIL BECAUSE OF POOR ATTENDANCE. Remember if you are ill you must contact me the DAY OF CLASS (I’ve told you twice now)! Repeated tardiness will cost you points at the discretion of the professor. Please tell me if you are traveling a long distance from another class.

I will do my best to keep you informed if it is obvious to me that you may be failing or falling behind, but ultimately it is your responsibility to attend class and complete your assignments every week.

11. Support Services

If you are having difficulty with any part of this course, please make an appointment with the instructor.

12. Disabilities Services

I will be glad to work with the Office of Disabilities Services (203 WHIT, 474-5655) to provide reasonable accommodation to students with disabilities. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office and provide a letter of accommodation within three weeks of the start of class. Letters of accommodation will be accepted at any time, but will not be applied retroactively after three weeks.


[*]Exceptions will be made for exceptional circumstances, but you better be bleeding, unconscious or actively administering CPR, I kid not!

351 Makeup for Theatre

THR 351    3 Credits    Spring
Makeup for Theatre (1+4) h
Theatrical makeup for actors, teachers, directors, and other theatre workers; makeup materials and use, age and character makeup, injuries and horror, Kabuki, cross-gender, animal, illusory and plastic relief, crepe hair beards, and influence of lighting. Student will spend approximately $85 for materials and book for this class.

THR 351: Makeup for the Theatre

Time: Monday 2:15-5:15         Location: Women’s Dressing Room FAC 105A        Credit Hours: 3

Instructor: Bethany Marx, Asst. Professor        Office: FAC 109B               Office phone: 474-5365

Email: bmarx2@alaska.edu      Office Hours: Mon 12:00-1:00, Wed 1:00-3:00 or by appointment

Supplies:

  • Theatrical Makeup Kit (Mehron All-Pro, BenNye Student Kit, Kryolan Aquacolor or equivalent)
  • Mascara
  • Fabric headband, hair tie or bandana (means for keeping hair out of face)
  • Camera (You may bring a personal camera each week, or buy a disposable for this class)

——————

  • Binder or portfolio
  • Clear, 3-hole sheet protectors
  • Tracing paper
  • Colored pencils, including skin tones
  • Additional class supplies and specialty makeup including sponges, Q-tips and applicators, “actor photos,” hand towel s, facewash, cold cream, baby wipes and lotion will be provided.
  • You may also choose to purchase a tackle box or makeup case to store your supplies.
  • Recommended Text:  Stage Makeup by Richard Corson
  • You are not required to purchase a textbook for this class; however, this is the text I recommend if you are interested in further study.

Expectations/Course Goals

This course teaches the basics of makeup application for the theatre through a series of exercises, beginning with basic corrective makeup and working through old age, injuries, animal designs and fantasy makeup. Students will research and create their own makeup designs each week, culminating in a final design project at the end of the semester. The course is organized to allow students to learn how to apply makeup on themselves as well as others.

Preparation for Class

Students are expected to arrive to class prepared to apply makeup. Men should be clean shaven and women should wash off any street makeup prior to the start of class. Hair should be pulled back out of the face, including bangs and fly-aways.

Bring all of your makeup to class every day. You never know what you might need. Supplies must be taken home at the end of each class. There is no way to lock the classroom. The Student Drama Association rents lockers in the hall outside of the women’s dressing room if you wish to keep your makeup at the theatre.

You will be given two photos of yourself to use for makeup designs. Please bring these to class every day. Certain assignments will require you to design makeup for a partner and you will need to exchange photos to do this.

Assignments/Attendance

Each week, students will complete an in-class makeup exercise, beginning with simple techniques and building up to more difficult projects. Most weeks there will be a preparatory research and/or design assignment pertaining to the next week’s exercise. Because the class only meets once a week and all makeup application will occur during class, it is imperative that all students be PREPARED, PRESENT AND ON TIME TO EVERY CLASS.

Students may be excused at the discretion of the instructor for illness, family emergency or life event ONLY if the absence is cleared IN ADVANCE.[*] I will not back down on this. If I do not have a phone call or email from you by 2:00 on Monday, you are “shit outta luck.” Documented proof, such as a doctor’s note, hospital bill or obituary may be required to obtain an excused absence. Students who miss class unexcused will not earn attendance or preparation points for that class AND WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO MAKE UP THE ASSIGNMENT FOR THAT DAY. So basically, you may choose to miss a class if you feel you can afford to lose the points. Students who have obtained an excuse will still lose the attendance points for that day, but will have the opportunity to make up class exercises. Students who are consistently late will be penalized at the discretion of the professor.

In-Class Assignments  Most classes will begin with approximately 30-45 minutes of lecture/demonstration. Students will then have 1 ½ to 2 hours to experiment with techniques and complete the assignment. Students will photograph the final application before washing their face. The final 30 minutes of class are for cleanup and explanation of next week’s project/homework.  Some classes will not run the entire three hours, however students are encouraged to stay, practice and experiment with makeup techniques until excused by the instructor.

Makeup Portfolio  Weekly designs, research and exercises will be documented and NEATLY compiled into a makeup portfolio.  This should be aesthetically consistent, neat and attractive. (That means you use the same paper, same labeling technique, layout etc throughout.) The portfolio will be turned in once at mid-semester for a preliminary grade and again at the end of the semester for a final grade. I recommend you prepare the portfolio ahead of time so you can simply insert pages each week. If you do not have a good photo printer at home, remember you can upload photos to Walmart.com and pick up your prints at the store.

Final Project  At the end of the semester, students will research, design and prepare a final project to be executed during the final exam period. This project will be graded in two parts: your preparation, research and design, and your execution on exam day. The project may include hairstyles, accessories or costume pieces which can be completed in advance, but actual application of makeup must be done during the exam. You will have a class period beforehand in which to practice any new techniques.

Research

When researching for your makeup assignments, it is important to use only primary research. In other words, pictures of actual elderly people, black eyes, tigers, etc. Pictures of other people’s makeup, including images from plays/movies, are not appropriate research in most cases (clowns being one exception).

Cheating=Bad. Learning=Good.

Because most of the work for this class will be completed in my presence, I am not too concerned about you not doing your own work, but just in case…Don’t copy, don’t cheat. Don’t have someone draw or research for you. Don’t steal a design concept from some production you saw before I moved up here. Remember, cheating=bad, learning=good. Plus, if I catch you cheating, or your work doesn’t look like yours, you’ll lose all the points for the assignment. If I catch you cheating a second time, you’ll fail my class. And who wants that? Nobody.

Also, please treat your instructor, the dressing room, the equipment, supplies and your fellow students with respect. While I may allow conversation during class from time to time, please stick to suitable subjects and limit the use of inappropriate language.

(Please refer to the UAF Catalog Academics and Regulations under Student Code of Conduct for more information on the University’s policies regarding student behavior. I am very serious about this. Please do your own work.)

Grading

Attendance-14 classes                                                   5 points                each                     70 points, 15%

Preparation-14 classes                                                   5 points                each                     70 points, 15%

Preliminary Portfolio Grade                                                                                         20 points, 5%

Makeup Portfolio*

Overall portfolio layout, neatness, etc.                                                          20 points, 5%

Research-10 assignments                                     5 points each                     50 points, 11%

Designs-10 assignments                                        5 points each                     50 points, 11%

Applications-12 assignments                               10 points each                   120 points, 27%

Final Exam                                                                                                                          50 points, 11%

Total:     450

*If a student fails to complete a research/design assignment, they may not be allowed to complete the class application for that week. Absent students who have not been excused will not be allowed to make up the application missed, but can still earn the points for design/research assignments for that week.

Both final projects for this class are due at the very end of the semester, though I will provide a mid-semester progress grade to everyone who turns in a preliminary portfolio. It may be difficult for you, and even me, to ascertain your final grade in the class prior to you turning in your portfolio and final exam. I will do my best to keep you informed if it is obvious to me that you may be failing or falling behind, but ultimately it is your responsibility to attend class and complete your assignments every week.

A+ 97-100%        B+ 87-89%           C+ 77-79%           D+ 65-70%

A 93-96%             B 83-86%              C 73-76%              D 60-64%    Failing is below 58 percent

A-90-92%             B- 80-82%            C- 70-72%            D- 58-59%

Disabilities

I will be glad to work with the Office of Disabilities Services (203 WHIT, 474-7043) to provide reasonable accommodation to students with disabilities. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office and provide a letter of accommodation within three weeks of the start of class. Letters of accommodation will be accepted at any time, but will not be applied retroactively after three weeks.

Blackboard

All information included on this syllabus, detailed assignment instructions and up-to-date grades will be available on Blackboard at classes.uaf.edu within the first few weeks of the semester.

Tentative Schedule/Class topics

1/23 Go over syllabus. Take class photos. Lecture on light, bone structure, makeup tools and application demonstration.

Assignment: Have makeup kit  and above-the-line supplies for next class

1/30 Basic Corrective Makeup

Assignment: Have below-the-line supplies for next class

2/6 Designing Makeup/Modeling with Highlights and Shadows

Assignment: Old age research and design

2/13 Old Age makeup on face and hands with stippling

Assignment: Bruising and black eye research/design

2/20 Superficial injuries-Black eyes and Bruises, Split Lips, Bloody noses

Assignment: Design your face with a different nose and eyebrows. Nose must include a profile view.

Freshman Progress Reports-Grades will be based on attendance and participation only.

2/27 Modeling wax-blocking out eyebrows and reshaping noses

Assignment: Research burns and deep cuts/design

3/5 Simple Prosthetic Injuries-Deep cut and Severe burn techniques, Stitches

Assignment: Research scars, design scarring for your face or arm

MAKEUP PORTFOLIOS ARE DUE FOR PRELIMINARY GRADE BEFORE SPRING BREAK

Should include first four exercises and first two designs: Basic corrective, Modeling, Old Age and Bruises. Due by Friday at 5:00 pm. May be turned in during class.

3/12 Spring Break-No class

3/19 Making liquid latex/tissue scar prosthetics

Assignment: Research and design your own concept for Death using only makeup (no prosthetics)

3/26 Death Makeup

Assignment: Research Kabuki, Chinese Opera or clown makeup, design for a partner.

4/2 Chinese theatre or clown makeup on another person

Assignment: Furry animal research and design with gender specification

4/9 Animal face

Assignment: Research dragons, gargoyles, lizards. Design reptilian makeup with prosthetic element

4/16 Reptile face

Assignment: Design a series of 3 fairies, nymphs, butterflies or other “light” or “good” fantasy characters, one for a partner, two using your own face. Does not need to be a full face design.

4/23 Fantasy makeup on another person and yourself

4/30 Practice Day for Final Exam. Makeup Portfolio due.

Final Exam Monday May 7, 3:15-5:15 p.m.


[*]Exceptions will be made for exceptional circumstances, but damn it, you better be bleeding, unconscious or actively administering CPR, I kid not!