Author Archives: Prof. Mendelowitz

Spring Shorts – 2017

Spring Shorts
April 21 & 22, 2017
A collection of one-acts written by Kavelina Torres

“Little Bits” by Kavelina Torres, directed by Amanda Casterline
“Gabby’s Descent” by Kavelina Torres, directed by Emily Ross
“Cacetugmi” by Kavelina Torres, directed by Frederica Matumeak
Readers Theatre:
“Coffee” by Kavelina Torres, directed by Nancy Nguyen
“That Time Last Summer When…” by Kavelina Torres, directed by Nancy Nguyen
“Jin and Baron” by Kavelina Torres, directed by Amanda Casterline

 

Five Women Wearing the Same Dress

Five Women Wearing the Same Dress poster

Production poster

“Five Women Wearing the Same Dress” by Alan Ball
Directed by Carrie Baker
March 24 – April 2, 2017

Cast
Frances……………………………Natilly Hovda
Meredith……………………….Sarah Williams
Trisha…………………………..Meghan Fowler
Georgeanne………………………Jill Shipman
Mindy…………………………….Brandi Larson
Tripp………………………………….Jared Olin

Photos follow the Production Crew listing.

Director… Carrie Baker
Set Designer… Kade Mendelowitz
Technical Director… Adam Gillette
Carpenters… Mary Conlin, Freddy Gryder
Costume Designer… Amanda Casterline
Costume Shop Supervisor… Jerene Mosier
Costume Construction… Lara Lotze ,Frederica Matumeak and Jerene Mosier
Lighting Designer… Colby Freel
Electricians… Elsbeth Cheyne, Colby Freel, Lara Lotze, Frederica Matumeak, Kailey Miranda and Emily Ross
Sound Designer… Andrew Cassel
Props Master… Kailey Miranda
Assistant Director / Understudy… Nancy Nguyen
Stage Manager… Emily Ross
Assistant Stage Managers… Amanda Casterline and Bella Sellers
Marketing / Box Office… Nannette Pierson
Poster Designer / Social Media Director… Kade Mendelowitz
Casting Director / Vocal Coach… Andrew Cassel

Official review from the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Official review from the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

“Winter Shorts” – Fall 2017

October, 2016
The Winter Shorts, Fall 2017 included:

A Winter Conversation Written and Directed by Nancy Nguyen
Surface Break Written by Nate Cole, directed by Ariana Polanco
The Next Mrs. Jacob Anderson Written Written by Ann Wuehler, directed by Erlee Hjellen
The Stephen King Cameo Written Written by Michael Shaeffer, directed by Jill Shipman
Tipping Point Written by Paul McKinley, directed by Amanda Casterline

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof production poster“Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” by Tennessee Williams
Directed by Rebecca George
April 15-24, 2016

BRICK…………………………………………………..Jaron Carlson
MARGARET…………………………………………..Mary Conlin
BIG DADDY………………………………………….Steve Mitchell
BIG MAMA…………………………………………………Siri Tuttle
MAE…………………………………………………Katrina Kuharich
GOOPER………………………………………………Thomas Petrie
DIXIE……………………………………………………….Molly Cable
TRIXIE………………………………………………………Lizzy Cable
SONNY……………………………………………………Josie Adasiak
POLLY………………………………………………Charlotte Phillips
DOC BAUGH……………………………………Michael Shaeffer
REVEREND TOOKER………………………..Sam Thompson

Photos follow the production crew listing.

Read the official review of the production.

Read the official review of the production.

Would you care to read the article written by the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner about the production?

Would you care to read the article written by the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner about the production?

Director…Rebecca George
Scenic Designer…Adam Gillette
Costume Designer……Amanda Casterline
Lighting Designer…Kade Mendelowitz
Sound Designer…Chris John George
Stage Manager…Andrew Cassel
Assistant Stage Manager, Prop Master…Ben Coffroth
Technical Director & Master Electrician….Adam Gillette
Sound & Light Board Operator….Carl Sage
Scene Shop Manager..Adam Gillette
Scene Shop Assistants…Katrina Kuharich, Thomas Petrie
Carpentry Crew……..Wally Drumhiller, Mary Conlin, Carl Sage
Costume Shop Manager…..Jerene Mosier
Costume Shop Assistants..Amanda Casterline, Stephanie Rivet
Wardrobe & Makeup Supervisor…Frederica Matumeak
Hair Supervisor….Kaylee Larson
Costume Stitchers…Amanda Casterline, Stephanie Rivet, Linnea Doumas, Frederica Matumeak
Publicity Photographers.Kade Mendelowitz & Nannette Pierson
Box Office Manager / Public Relations / Poster Design..Nannette Pierson
Box Office Assistant.. Stephanie Rivet
House Manager/Head Usher… Ariana Polanco

Closer

Closer poster

Left to right: Brandi Larson, Mallory Smyth, Katrina Kuharich and Andrew Cassel star in “Closer”

“Closer”

Written by Patrick Marber
Directed by Ian Buoncore

Presented by the UAF Department of Theatre & Film February 12-21, 2016

Set Designer: Carl Sage
Costume Designer: Jerene Mosier
Lighting Designer: Kade Mendelowitz
Sound Designer: Richard Atkin
Stage Manager: Ariana Polanco

Cast
(in order of appearance)
Alice Katrina Kuharich
Dan Mallory Smyth
Larry Andrew Cassel
Anna Brandi Larson

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner did an article about the production.

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner did an article about the production. (PDF)

Official Review

Official Review (pdf)

UAF Sun Star did a story (pdf)

UAF Sun Star did a story (pdf)

 

“Winter Shorts” Fall, 2015

Winter Shorts Poster Fall, 2015

Poster by Sam Thompson

This year’s Winter Shorts consists of three distinct segments: Antigone, Devised, and Ground Squirrel Improv.

December 11-13, 2015

Antigone, by Sophocles, is a classic tragedy set in the aftermath of a civil war in the Greek city state of Thebes. It details the consequences arising from Antigone’s choice to defy an edict from the new king Creon banning any memorial for Polyneices, one of the two royal brothers who were both slain in the war. The production is directed by UAF Senior Theatre major Carl L Sage, who also serves as the designer of all the shows technical aspects (scenery, lighting, and costumes). With the assistance of a production grant from the University of Alaska Fairbanks office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarly Activity (URSA),

Winter Shorts 2015 News-Miner Article

The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner featured a blurb on the production, Dec. 10, 2015.

Antigone is meant to serve as a capstone for Mr Sage’s undergraduate theatrical education. The productions ensemble based cast features Elsbeth Cheyne as Antigone, Mary Conlin as Chorus B, Roxy Lane as Teiresias/Messenger, Tristan Matson as Guard/Haemon, Emily Ross as Chorus A, Andrew Vey as Creon, and Justine Webb as Ismene/Eurydice.

Devised is a collaboratively created theatrical piece, created and choreographed by performers Cynthia Jones, Katrina Kuharich, and Sierra Trinchet. Using music and motion, Devised explores the themes of growth and self-discovery.

Ground Squirrel Improv is a locally based improvisational comedy troupe. Troupe members Elsbeth Cheyne, Eugene Cole, Skyler Evans, Andrew Graham, and Andrew Vey draw on audience input to create spur of the moment comedy.

Stop Kiss

“Stop Kiss”

Stop Kiss production poster

Stop Kiss production poster

Written by Diana Son
Directed by Carrie Baker

Presented by the UAF Department of Theatre & Film October 30-November 8, 2015

Set & Lighting Designer: Kade Mendelowitz
Costume Designer: Stephanie Sandberg
Sound Designer: Chris John George
Stage Manager: Colby Freel

Cast
(in order of appearance)
CALLIE Katrina Kuharich
SARA Sierra Trinchet
DETECTIVE COLE Nate Cole
MRS. WINSLEY/NURSE Cynthia Jones
GEORGE Corey DiRutigliano
PETER Mallory Smyth

Review from the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Review from the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Review from the Sun Star

Review from the Sun Star

"Stop Kiss" article in the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

“Stop Kiss” article in the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Assistant Directer: Sam Thompson
Assistant Stage Managers: Mary Conlin, Andrew Glynn, Ariana Polanco, Paloma Polanco

Video spotlights are after the production photos below:



The Ash Girl

Ash Girl Poster“The Ash Girl”

Written by Timberlake Wertenbaker
Directed by Brian EG Cook

Presented by the UAF Department of Theatre & Film April 17-26, 2015


Cast:

  • Carrie Baker as Sadness
  • Kellie Bernstein as Gluttontoad
  • Melissa Buchta as Fairy
  • Molly Cable as Mouse 3
  • Elsbeth Cheyne as Slothworm
  • Amelia Cooper as Greedmonkey
  • Nicole Cowans as Ashgirl
  • Leilani Eames as Mouse 1
  • Freddy Gryder as Envysnake
  • Marley Horner as Prince Amir
  • Cynthia Jones as Angerbird
  • Brian Kerley as Man in the Forest
  • Katrina Kuharich as Ruth
  • Jessica MacLeod as Stepmother
  • Sambit Misra as Paul
  • Nancy Nguyen as Judith
  • Charlotte Phillips as Mouse 2
  • Ariana Polanco as Princess Zehra
  • Paloma Polanco as Owl
  • Mallory Smyth as Pridefly
  • Sierra Trinchet as Lust
  • Ethan Whitfield as Otter

Production Team

  • Director and Scenic Designer: Brian Cook
  • Costume Designer: Bethany Marx
  • Lighting Designer: Kade Mendelowitz
  • Sound Designer: Chris John George
  • Stage Manager: Ian Buoncore

Saucy Jacks and When All Else Fails

Winter Shorts LogoTwo one-act plays and some improv! UAF English Major Grace McCarthy’s “When All Else Fails”, and esteemed local playwright Michael Shaeffer’s “Saucy Jacks”, accompanied by improv from our very own Ground Squirrel Improv Troupe! Each play is directed, performed, designed, and crewed by UAF students.

When All Else Fails“When All Else Fails” by Grace McCarthy
Directed by Ian Buoncore
Featuring (l-r) Theodore Hooker, Mallory Smyth, Katrina Kuharich, Nancy Nguyen and Elsbeth Cheyne.
Set design & Technical Direction by Marley Horner
Costume design by Nicki Karl
Lighting design by Matt Hutter
"Saucy Jacks" by Michael Shaeffer. Directed by Tyler McClendon.“Saucy Jacks” by Michael Shaeffer.
Directed by Tyler McClendon.
Featuring (l-r) Theodore Hooker, Nate Cole and Sierra Trinchet.
Set design & Technical Direction by Marley Horner
Costume design by Fiona Zachel
Lighting design by Matt Hutter

All photos by Kade Mendelowitz

FilmUAF Video Resources


Intro: A 5-second .mov that includes the Theatre/Film UAF logo and website, featuring an Alpha-channel which can be used to automatically transition into your video (just 3 frames so it’s VERY short) and a dramatic music “bump” that goes with it.
1280 x 720, 30fps, 231 mb. http://theatrefilmuaf.org/resources/Theatre-Film-Logo-2014-Intro-w-alpha.mov (you may wish to “right-click” and “download” the file instead of opening it).


Outtro: A 15.04 second .mov that includes a “Swipe” with an Alpha-channel which can be used to automatically transition from your video (.5 seconds worth).  After the 1-second total swipe, the Theatre/Film UAF logo and website are in the upper left corner, as the official UAF paint-splatter “donut” plays…with the UAF logo and “Naturally Inspiring” eventually wiping on.  There is no music that accompanies this – it is an opportunity for you to continue your credits music.
1280 x 720, 24fps (that’s what UAF’s ‘donut’ was), 679 mb. http://theatrefilmuaf.org/resources/TheatreFilmUAFOuttro.mov (you may wish to “right-click” and “download” the file instead of opening it).

Theatre UAF 2011 LogoOverlay: An oversized version of the Theatre/Film UAF logo (with website) featuring an Alpha-channel which can be laid over your video or used as part of a credit crawl.
The logo is all in white.  It is oversized so that you may easily adjust it to fit your needs, and perhaps consider using a “drop shadow”, “alpha-glow” (set to dark) or “stroke” effect (or combination of any/all of those without quickly running into a “square” edge.
This effect can look very classy with the opacity of the logo layer dropped down (to 60% for example) so that some original movement or color shows through.
921×823 transparent .png, 77kb (small): http://theatrefilmuaf.org/resources/TheatreFilm-Logo-BW-with-website-Overlay.png (you may wish to “right-click” and “download” the file instead of opening it).
Note: May appear blank in a web-browser because the logo is white and is surrounded by a transparent background.  It will look fine in your video editor however.

Color (blue and white) version of the Theatre/Film UAF logo (with website) on an Alpha-channel.  Looks like the logo above; but larger.
http://theatrefilmuaf.org/resources/Theatre_Film_wUAF_LogoWebsite_2014.png

An Inspector Calls

An Inspector Calls production poster“An Inspector Calls”

Written by J. B. Priestley
Directed by Brian Cook

Presented by the UAF Department of Theatre & Film November 7-16, 2014

Rachel Blackwell (Mrs. Birling)
Ian Hendren (Gerald Croft)
Marley Horner (Inspector Goole)
Katrina Kuharich (Sheila Birling)
Nancy Nguyen (Edna)
Nolan Raapana (Mr. Birling)
Mallory Smyth (Eric Birling)

Costume & Scenic Designer: Bethany Marx
Lighting Designer: Adam Gillette
Assistant Director: Ian Buoncore
Stage Manager: Kellie Bernstein
British Dialect Coach: Carrie Baker
Assistant Stage Manager: Ethan Whitfield

An Inspector Calls official News-Miner review

News-Miner review

The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner did an article about the opening of the production.

News-Miner article

UAF Sun Star did an article about the production.

Sun Star article

UAF Sun Star review

UAF Sun Star review

 

480 Documentary Filmmaking

JRN/FLM F480 F01Documentary Filmmaking

Spring 2013

Prof. Robert Prince

Office: Bunnell 105C

Office Phone: 474-6249

E-mail: rob.prince@alaska.edu

 

Required Reading:

Artis, Anthony Q., The Shut Up and Shoot Documentary Guide, Focal Press 2007

ISBN-10: 0240809351  ISBN-13: 978-0240809359

Our documentary filmmaking textbook is available online through our library link:

http://goldmine.uaf.edu/uhtbin/cgisirsi.exe/W3UnCqC9YN/UAFRAS/250960067/9  

 

Course Description:

JRN F480       Documentary Filmmaking (h)
3 Credits         Offered Spring

Basics of hands-on documentary filmmaking techniques, including preproduction, production and postproduction. Different documentary filmmaking directing styles and the process of distributing a documentary. Each student will produce a short documentary as the capstone of the course. Special fees apply. Prerequisites: Basic experience in shooting and editing video or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with: FLM F480. (3+0)

___________________________

Course Goals:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be expected to have a working knowledge of how to effectively produce, direct, and edit a short documentary.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

1)      Know how to write a budget and treatment

2)      Know how to film a good story and acquire the necessary content

3)      Know how to organize the edit of their film and distribute it

Instructional Methods:

This course will be taught through lectures, class activities, and production work.

____________________

Expectations of Students:

  1. Push yourself to do your best work for this class.  If you don’t do your best work now, when will you do it?  Remember who writes your recommendation letters.
  2. Arrive to class on time.  Tardiness will result in a reduced grade (see “Attendance/Tardiness” below) and may prevent you from taking quizzes.
  3. Make sure your cell phones are on silent.
  4. Laptops are allowed in class, however I reserve the right to close your laptop if I suspect you are using it for non-class-related purposes regardless of whether or not I have evidence to support that suspicion.
  5. Come to class prepared, having completed the required homework and ready to participate in class discussions.
  6. Attend every class.  Unexcused absences will results in a reduced grade (see “Attendance/Tardiness” below).
  7. Participate in every class.
  8. Check your Blackboard e-mail every weekday.
  9. Respect your peers.  Support and encourage them and offer constructive criticism of their projects.
  10. Ask questions during or after class when you do not understand something or are having a problem.  If you don’t understand something, chances are at least some of your peers don’t understand it either.
  11. Take notes.
  12. If you are having a problem outside of class that is affecting your ability to perform in this class, please let me know as soon as you can.  You do not need to disclose the details of your situation.  Although doing well in college is very important and you need to work hard, do not let the pressure overwhelm you.  Your personal health and sanity are more important than good marks.  I consider myself a very easy person to talk to and encourage you to come speak to me if you need to discuss issues course-related or otherwise.

______________

Equipment Policies

Access to the computers and video production equipment is on a first come, first serve basis.  Access to the editing room is available virtually 24-7.  You will need permission from us to have security let you in the building during the weekend.

Cameras must be checked out and returned through Amy Simpson, the department assistant, Robert Prince or Jason Lazarus.  The Monday-Friday hours when you can do that will be announced as soon as possible.  We recommend that you reserve equipment well in advance of when you need it.  Cameras can be checked out for only one evening or the weekend. You have to sign a waiver before you can check out any equipment.  Cameras and editing equipment are also available for check out through the Rasmuson library.

The hard drives on the lab computers will be erased every Friday afternoon to prevent the buildup of excessive files on the drives.  If you need an exception from this, make sure to let Jason Lazarus or me know.

Building Access:

Access to the Journalism computer lab is virtually 24/7 with your Polar Express card.  As long as you can get into the Bunnell Building, you can access the lab.  You can remain in the lab after the building has closed.  The lab is not open to students when classes are meeting in the lab.  Those times will be posted on the lab door.  If you are in the lab when a class is about to begin, you will be asked to leave.  Note that some classes meet only occasionally in the lab and professors do their best to post those times on the door in advance of the class meeting time.

Bunnell Building hours vary.  Note that sometimes the south entrance by the Journalism Department is locked while one or both of the north entrances by the flags are open, so try the other doors if you cannot enter through the south entrance.

_________________________

Final Grade Breakdown:

  • Attendance/Tardiness: 20%
  • Production Assignment—Interview:  15%
  • Synopsis, Treatment and Budget:  5%
  • Final Project: 30%
  • Midterm Examination: 25%
  • Quizzes:  5%

 

Expectations for grading components:

Attendance/Tardiness: 20%

 

“Eighty percent of success is showing up.”

—Woody Allen

 

Each unexcused absence in this class will reduce your final grade.  If you have six or more unexcused absences, then you will automatically fail the course REGARDLESS of if your other grades were high enough to allow you to pass the course.

Excused absences will not affect your attendance grade (though you will lose the extra credit).  An excused absence is when you have notified me before class that you will not be able to make it to class for a valid reason: sick, personal emergency, etc.  “I’m too busy” or “I can’t find a ride to class” are not valid reasons for missing class.

You must notify me BEFORE class for an absence to be excused.  Telling me hours or days later why you missed class will not excuse the absence.  Treat this class like a job.  If you don’t show up to work and don’t call in, you get fired.  The only exception to this rule is that I will accept a doctor’s note up to a week after you return to class as an excuse for an absence.

Students who have zero absences (excused or unexcused) and no tardies will receive extra credit in their final grade.  Any absence or tardy for any reason will remove this extra credit, unless you have earned a free tardy which I give out on occasion.

Make sure to contact me after an absence to see what announcements or assignments you missed.  I recommend you ask a fellow student for a copy of their notes from that class to see what material we covered.

 

“Twenty percent of success is showing up…on time.”

—Robert Prince

 

Because coming late to class disrupts class, at times can force us to wait for you, and can mean missing important announcements, every three times you arrive late to class I will add one absence to your grade.  Redefine “on time” to class in your mind to mean “five minutes early.”  If you do arrive to class late, make sure to see me after class to make sure I mark you as present and let you know about any announcements I may have made that day.  If you forget to tell me you were late for class, you will receive an absence.

 

Here is how your absences will affect your final grade:

 

0 Absences (and zero tardies) = 110% for attendance (equals +2% extra credit)

Unexcused Absence = -10% from attendance grade per each

6+ Unexcused Absences = Automatically fail the course

 

Production Assignment—Interview:  15%

Film an approximately five minute interview with a subject that you may or may not intend to use in your final project.  Pay special attention to the composition, background, audio, focus, white balance and exposure.  A detailed description of the assignment will be handed out in class.

 

Synopsis, Treatment and Budget:  5%

Write a synopsis, treatment and budget for the project you intend to do for this class.  The synopsis should be a one or two sentence core description of your project.  The treatment is an approximately one-page pitch for your project including style and format of the film.  The budget should include cost estimates for the entire production as if you were actually paying for the equipment the university is providing. A detailed description of the assignment will be handed out in class.

 

Final Project: 30%

The capstone assignment for this course will be short documentary between 5-15 minutes long.  Students who wish to produce a half-hour film with the intention of having it broadcast can do so with special permission.  The final documentary projects will be presented in a public screening during the final exam period. A detailed description of the assignment will be handed out in class.

 

Midterm Examination: 25%

Covers the readings and lectures.

 

Quizzes:  5%

Cover material from recent lectures and exercises.  Missed quizzes can be made up only for excused absences.

 

Final Exam: 

There will be no final exam, however I reserve use of the final exam period for a public performance of your final projects.

 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

Grading Guidelines:

A:  An honor grade that indicates originality and independent work, mastery of the subject and the satisfactory completion of more work than is regularly required.  To get an “A,” students in my classes need to impress me with the work they’ve done on an assignment and go well beyond what I asked for in the assignment.

94%-100% = A, 90%-93% = A-

 

B:  Indicates outstanding ability above the average level of performance.  To get a “B,” students in my classes need to do exactly what I asked for in the assignment and do it well.

87%-89% = B+, 84%-86% = B, 80%-83% = B-

 

IMPORTANT GRADING POLICY INFORMATION

 

Implications of the Grade of ‘C’ (and below) for letter-graded

undergraduate courses which are:

 

–Prerequisites for other courses, or

–Degree major requirements, or

–Core courses

 

C+ (2.3): Satisfactory to Fair: satisfactory level of performance, with some

mastery of material.

C (2.0): Average: satisfactory level of performance and level of competency

in the subject. A minimum grade of ‘C’ (2.0) is required for all

prerequisites and major courses.

C- (1.7): Barely satisfactory: Minimum grade required for all Core (X)

Courses. A grade of C- (1.7) in a class which is a prerequisite for another

class or in a class required for a student’s major will result in the

student being required to retake the class.

77%-79% = C+, 74%-76% = C, 70%-73% = C-

 

D+ (1.3); D (1.0); D- (0.7): Below Average: Fair to poor level of competency

in the subject matter.  A grade of D+, D or D- in a Core (X) class will

automatically require the student to retake the class to receive core

credit, starting Fall 2011.

67%-69% = D+, 64%-66% = D, 60%-63% = D-

 

F:  Indicates failure to meet lowest standards.  To get an “F,” students in my classes will have missed major elements of the assignment and/or the content will be all—or nearly all—poor quality.

0%-59% = F

 

For additional grading policy information, see the UAF Catalog.

 

Course Policies:

Late work or quizzes will be docked 15% plus an additional 15% for each class period it is not turned in after the due date.  Backup your work, reserve video equipment, and work ahead of deadlines so you can avoid these problems.  If you miss the midterm exam, you will need documentation proving the legitimacy of your absence to avoid the 15% grade reduction.

 

Projects can be redone only if there is sufficient evidence that a requirement(s) of the assignment was described in a way that a reasonable adult would find confusing or ambiguous and that unclear element of the assignment directly related to the student’s reduced grade.

 

All work must comply with the University of Alaska Fairbanks policies on student conduct found online at www.uaf.edu/catalog/current/academics/regs3.html.

All work must be original productions for this course and plagiarism will result in a zero for the assignment, a possible F for the class, and potentially further academic discipline.  Ignorance of what it means to plagiarize will not be an excuse from punishment.  If you have questions about plagiarism, contact me before you hand in the assignment.

 

I will make reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities. Notify me within the first two weeks of the semester if you have any special needs.

 

Journalism Lab Policies:

Welcome to the Journalism Labs!  The following is a list of tips and guidelines for lab usage to insure that your experience in any of our labs goes smoothly and is highly productive.  If you have any questions at all about the following, please either ask your instructor or our Computer Tech, Jason, available at Bunnell 102b, 474-6020 or fyjbtech@uaf.edu.

 

•           First note that you’re working on Macintosh computers – if you’re not used to these types of computers, have limited computing skills, or are unfamiliar with OS X (the operating system), please inform the instructor of this so that extra help can be dispensed when needed.

•           Each of the computers in our three labs are password protected with different passwords for each lab – Please request passwords from your instructor only. Do not give out these passwords to anyone.

•           Many of you will opt to save your files on Thumbdrives (USB drives).  These work great for saving and transporting your work between home and school.  But, unlike PC’s, Macs expect you to “eject” or “unmount’ your thumbdrive before you unattach it from your computer.  Do so by dragging your thumbdrive from the desktop to the trash bin (which will change to an “eject” symbol).  Not doing this can cause you to lose your information and possibly ruin the thumbdrive.

•           Save and save often!  You will be able to not only save on your computer but have several other options to save your files – always use the default (saving to your computer) as well as one of the following secondary methods to insure you don’t lose your files.  Your instructor will give you access to the Journalism file server which can be used for all your files (short of large video files and personal files).  You can also use email to send files to yourself or use thumbdrives to carry your files home with you.  Additionally, Lab 128 and 106 are fully equipped with CD/DVD burners and 126 has several CD/DVD burners as well.  At any time your computer could crash and your files could be lost – save in at least one more location!  Additionally, this insures that if someone is using “your” computer, you don’t have to wait for them to get off of it.

•           Do not abuse the computers.  DCC as well as the Journalism Department monitors computer usage and will report improper use of departmental equipment.  Treat these computers as if someone is watching your usage – because they are!  Additionally, do not damage, hit, or take your frustrations out on any of our equipment.  If you’re getting frustrated – walk away and take a break.

•           Don’t leave any personal items in the labs after class.  Once or twice a week each lab will be cleaned and all personal items will be thrown away or placed in a lost and found.

•           No food/drinks are allowed in 126 or 128.  For Lab 106, please try to limit your food to the tables.

•           We have film scanners, flatbed scanners, DV/miniDV Decks, Minidisc Recorders and DV Cameras available in our labs as well as for checkout.  Please talk to your instructor about access to any of these if you need them for a class project.  Check out will be posted in the Journalism Office.

•           Do not access highly personal items on these computers such as bank accounts and anything dealing with your social security number.  We have seen far too many people leave access to their bank accounts open on lab machines far after they’ve left the room.  Be vigilant!

•           Most of all if you’re having any problems talk to your instructor or our Computer Tech, Jason.  We’re all more than willing to help you out with any problem!  Jason is available quite a bit during normal office hours – please consult his schedule on his door.

 

Support Services:

I will make reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities, for example, providing an in-class note taker, providing a quiet and solitary test-taking environment, or other reasonable accommodations in line with your documented needs.  Disability services will provide you with documentary indicating what kind of assistance you need and, based on that evidence, I will implement that assistance to the best of my abilities. Notify me within the first two weeks of the semester if you have any special needs.

 

The departments listed below provide resources for students with disabilities, help writing papers, and help preparing for class presentations:

 

Disability Services

e-mail. fydso@uaf.edu

tel. 907-474-5655

tty. 907-474-1827

Whitaker Building Room 208

www.uaf.edu/disability

 

About Disability Services

At UAF Disability Services, our goal is to provide UAF students with access to academic classes and course materials through an interactive accommodation process.

UAF Disability Services provides accommodations to students on the Fairbanks campus as well as on the Bristol Bay, Chukchi, Interior Aleutians, Kuskokwim, Northwest, Community Technical College (CTC), Center For Distance Education (CDE), and College for Rural and Community Development (CRCD) campuses.

Students using community campuses or distance learning programs should contact Disability Services via telephone, fax, e-mail, U.S. postal mail, or in person to request and arrange for accommodations.

We enjoy supporting individuality, promoting independence and celebrating graduations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Center

Dept. Of English

801 Gruening Bldg.

(907) 474-7193

faengl@uaf.edu

 

The Writing Center is a student-staffed, student-oriented service of the English Department. Our tutors, English Department teaching assistants and a few outstanding undergraduate students, can assist you in all phases of the writing process, including the following:

 

  • Brainstorming and generating topics
  • Organizing ideas
  • Developing research strategies
  • Use of citation styles — MLA, APA, and Chicago
  • Editing for clarity and correctness

 

We collaborate with each student on a one-to-one basis, and we will work with students at any phase of the writing process — planning, drafting, revising. We can also help writers discover ways of improving grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.

Tutorials. Tutorial appointments at the Writing Center are 30 minutes long, and we encourage you to call or stop by to make an appointment. Walk-in sessions are often available, but in the last half of the semester we are often booked.

Fax Tutoring. We provide a fax tutoring service for students enrolled in the College of Rural and Community Development (CRCD). Students can fax their papers to us (1-800-478-5246), and they will have a telephone tutorial with a tutor at a designated time. We offer fax tutorials Monday through Thursday evenings and Sunday afternoons. Phone the Writing Center (907/474-5314) to make an appointment.

 

Speaking Center

Dept. of Communication

507 Greuning Bldg.

(907) 474-5470

fyspeak@uaf.edu

What is the Speaking Center?

The Speaking Center is a student-oriented service provided to facilitate preparing public presentations. Students can recieve coaching in refining their presentation topic, in organizing their presentation effectively, and in practicing their presentation. The Center makes it possible to digitally record and to watch one’s practice presentation, receiving constructive feed back from a Speaking Center coach.

 

Who can use the Speaking Center?

The Speaking center is available to all students currently enrolled at UAF or at TVC.

 

Scheduling Procedures

Please call 474-5470 or e-mail fyspeak@gmail.com to schedule an appointment at the Speaking Center. Walk-ins are welcome, however, students can be served only if there are openings.

Individuals may schedule the Center’s practice room daily any time prior to Speaking Center hours.

 

About Your Professor:

I grew up in East Lansing, Michigan and graduated from Calvin College with a B.A. in Telecommunications.  After college I went to work in Chicago for Kurtis Productions, producers of the Investigative Reports series on A&E.  I then was hired as a Producer/Director for the PBS affiliate in Grand Rapids, Michigan where I directed live and pre-recorded programs for local broadcast.  In 2000 I went back to Calvin to run the video production department.  While working there I earned my M.A. from Michigan State University in Telecommunication, Information Studies and Media.

In 2005 I moved to Fairbanks to teach video production and documentary filmmaking in the Journalism Department at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

 


 

Want more video classes?  Check these out:

 

JRN F251 Television Production

3 Credits / Offered Fall/ Prof. Prince

Television studio production, floor directing, audio, camera, staging, lighting and switching.

 

JRN F280 Video Storytelling (h)
3 Credits / Offered Fall / Prof. Prince

Basics of digital video production technology, composition, audio, lighting and editing as it relates to primarily non-fiction filmmaking. Students will conclude the course by producing their own short videos. Special fees apply. (Cross-listed with FLM F280.) (3+0)

 

JRN F290 Digital Video Editing

3 Credits / Offered As Demand Warrants / Prof. Prince

Introduction to the technical and aesthetic aspects of non-linear digital video editing. Students will go from little or no experience in non-linear editing to being comfortable with some of the advanced editing techniques. Address motion picture editing theories that are not bound to time or specific editing technology. Special fees apply. (Cross-listed with FLM F290.) (3+0)

 

JRN F453 Television News Reporting

3 Credits / Offered As Demand Warrants/ Prof. Prince

Electronic news gathering using videotape equipment, scriptwriting, location sound recording, interview techniques, editing, videography and other aspects of field news reporting. Prerequisites: COMM F131X or COMM F141X; JRN F451; JRN F452; or permission of the instructor. JRN F452 may be taken concurrently with JRN F453.

 

 

 

 

 

How do I log on to Journalism Lab Computers?

  • If you’re sitting at the logon screen, click “Other” to login.
  • If “Other” is unavailable, wait 10-15 seconds and it will pop up.
  • Use your UA Credentials (UA Username & password) to log in.
  • You will be prompted to enter your UA Credentials again to mount your Lab Shares –  you can choose to do this or “cancel”.

“UA Credentials”? What’s that?

  • Your UA Username & password are used for a variety of services at UAF, including UAF email through Gmail, Blackboard & ELMO.
  • Not sure of your UA Credentials?  At the computer logon screen, use the “JRNLABS” account to log in.  Your instructor can provide you with the password.  This is a shared account and does not provide the privacy of your individual account BUT it provides you with the exact same access to all programs.  From here, use an Internet Browser to visit  https://elmo.alaska.edu to reset your password or Blackboard / UAF Email to “check” that the password you’re using is correct.
  • DO NOT continue to “guess” the password.  You will lock yourself out of your accounts which requires OIT to reset.  In most cases when students can’t login, it’s because they’ve forgotten their password is case sensitive or they’ve forgotten the password altogether.
  • Are you logged into your UA account but it looks different than other students? Contact Jason Lazarus in Bun 114 or at 474-6020.

“Lab Shares”? What’s that?

  • All UAF students have paid a Technology Fee that gives them limited shared space that’s accessible from all OIT labs on campus – and now that same space is accessible in Journalism Labs.
  • Are your UA Credentials not working for the Lab Shares logon?  Click “Cancel” and continue – you’ll still be able to use the computer.  Contact Jason Lazarus in Bun 114 or at 474-6020 for additional assistance.
  • Lab Shares provides you with space to save files and have them accessible throughout all lab machines – saving on the desktop ONLY saves on that specific computer’s desktop.
  • When mounted, Lab Shares will be accessible from the right side of your dock.

Journalism “ASIP” Server?

  • This is where you’ll save your assignments so your instructor can grade your class projects.  This is shared Server space where anyone can see your files – so only save project material – not sensitive information!
  • Once you’re logged on and you’ve got a file you need to turn in for an assignment, your instructor will provide you with logon information for a specific folder for your class – click on “ASIP” (located on the right side of your dock) and use that login information.   Once you’ve logged on, you’ll be able to find “News-FS” (or “Photo-FS” or “Art-FS, depending on your logon info) on the left side of any finder window.
  • If you’ve got files you want to work on that are on the server, ALWAYS click-and-drag them to the desktop and THEN open them.  Once done, save & click & drag them back onto the server.  This insures you’re working LOCALLY – which is much faster and doesn’t bog down the computer.

As always, Journalism is not responsible for lost files on Lab Shares, ASIP or individual computers.  Every student is expected to back up their own data on thumbdrives, USB hard drives or CD/DVDs.

Questions?  Contact Jason Lazarus in Room 114, or 474-6020, for further assistance!

 


Tentative Course Schedule:

Date:

Subject:

ASSIGNMENT DUE:

WEEK 1

Introduction to the course

WEEK 2

Pre-Production Chapter 1: “Pre-Production”
– CONT’D Chapter 2: “Location, Location, Location”

Documentary Project Ideas

WEEK 3

– CONT’D 

 

BUDGETS, TREATMENTS, SYNOPSIS 

WEEK 4

WATCH DOCUMENTARIES  Using the CameraChapter 3: “Image Control and Camera Work”

WEEK 5

Lighting for DocumentaryChapter 4: “Lighting”

 

– CONT’D

WEEK 6

The Hardest Part:

 

Recording Clear AudioChapter 5: “Sound Recording”

Assignment:  Synopsis, Treatment and Budget – CONT’D 

WEEK 7

Getting the Shots you NeedChapter 6: “Composition & Coverage”

 

– CONT’D 

WEEK 8

Conducting the InterviewChapter 7: “Interview Prep” – CONT’DChapter 8: “Conducting Interviews”

WEEK 9

Spring Break 

 

Spring Break

WEEK 10

Review Interview FootageProduction Assignment: Interview Review Interview Footage

WEEK 11

The Cutting Room FloorChapter 9: “Post-Production”

 

– CONT’D

WEEK 12

View Raw FootageFinal Project Raw Footage View Raw Footage

WEEK 13

Publicity, Festivals, and Distribution

 

– CONT’D

WEEK 14

EXAM  IN CLASS EDITING PERIOD

WEEK 15

View Rough ProjectsFinal Project Rough Edits

 

View Rough Projects

WEEK 16

VIEW FINAL PROJECTSFinal Project Edits

 

VIEW FINAL PROJECTS

FINAL EXAM

Final project public screening:

1 – 3 p.m., Thursday, May 9

 

 

 

290 Digital Video Editing

JRN/FLM F290

Digital Video Editing

SPRING 2013

Prof. Robert Prince

Office: Bunnell 105C

E-mail: rob.prince@alaska.edu

 

Required Reading:

Media Composer 6: Part 1 – Editing Essentials (Avid Learning) [Paperback]

http://www.amazon.com/Media-Composer-Editing-Essentials-Learning/dp/1133727980/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1346114330&sr=8-4&keywords=avid+certification

Media Composer 6: Part 2 Effects Essentials (Avid Learning) [Paperback]

http://www.amazon.com/Media-Composer-Effects-Essentials-Learning/dp/1133788882/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_y

Course Description:

This class serves as an introduction to the technical and aesthetic aspects of non-linear digital video editing on AVID editing software.  Students will go from little or no experience in non-linear editing to being comfortable with some of the advanced features of the program.  In addition, the course will also address motion picture editing theories that are not bound to time or specific editing technology.

Course Goals:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be expected to have an intermediate to advanced knowledge of how to technically and artfully edit videos on AVID.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Edit footage acquired from a variety of sources
  2. Take advantage of some advanced editing features
  3. Tell a good story using images and audio

Instructional Methods:

This course will be taught through lectures, class activities and editing outside of class.

Building Access:

Access to the Journalism computer lab is virtually 24/7 with your Polar Express card.  As long as you can get into the Bunnell Building, you can access the lab.  You can remain in the lab after the building has closed.  The lab is not open to students when classes are meeting in the lab.  Those times will be posted on the lab door.  If you are in the lab when a class is about to begin, you will be asked to leave.  Note that some classes meet only occasionally in the lab and professors do their best to post those times on the door in advance of the class meeting time.

Bunnell Building hours vary.  Note that sometimes the south entrance by the Journalism Department is locked while one or both of the north entrances by the flags are open, so try the other doors if you cannot enter through the south entrance.

Expectations of Students:

  1. Push yourself to do your best work for this class.  If you don’t do your best work now, when will you do it?  Remember who writes your recommendation letters.
  2. Arrive to class on time.  Tardiness will result in a reduced grade (see “Attendance/Tardiness” below) and may prevent you from taking quizzes.
  3. Make sure your cell phones are on silent.
  4. Laptops are allowed in class, however I reserve the right to close your laptop if I suspect you are using it for non-class-related purposes regardless of whether or not I have evidence to support that suspicion.
  5. Come to class prepared, having completed the required homework and ready to participate in class discussions.
  6. Attend every class.  Unexcused absences will results in a reduced grade (see “Attendance/Tardiness” below).
  7. Participate in every class.
  8. Check your Blackboard e-mail every weekday.
  9. Respect your peers.  Support and encourage them and offer constructive criticism of their projects.
  10. Ask questions during or after class when you do not understand something or are having a problem.  If you don’t understand something, chances are at least some of your peers don’t understand it either.
  11. Take notes.
  12. If you are having a problem outside of class that is affecting your ability to perform in this class, please let me know as soon as you can.  You do not need to disclose the details of your situation.  Although doing well in college is very important and you need to work hard, do not let the pressure overwhelm you.  Your personal health and sanity are more important than good marks.  I consider myself a very easy person to talk to and encourage you to come speak to me if you need to discuss issues course-related or otherwise.

Grading:

Attendance/Tardiness: 20%

 

“Eighty percent of success is showing up.”

—Woody Allen

 

Each unexcused absence in this class will reduce your final grade.  If you have six or more unexcused absences, then you will automatically fail the course REGARDLESS of if your other grades were high enough to allow you to pass the course.

Excused absences will not affect your attendance grade (though you will lose the extra credit).  An excused absence is when you have notified me before class that you will not be able to make it to class for a valid reason: sick, personal emergency, etc.  “I’m too busy” or “I can’t find a ride to class” are not valid reasons for missing class.

You must notify me BEFORE class for an absence to be excused.  Telling me hours or days later why you missed class will not excuse the absence.  Treat this class like a job.  If you don’t show up to work and don’t call in, you get fired.  The only exception to this rule is that I will accept a doctor’s note up to a week after you return to class as an excuse for an absence.

Students who have zero absences (excused or unexcused) and no tardies will receive extra credit in their final grade.  Any absence or tardy for any reason will remove this extra credit, unless you have earned a free tardy which I give out on occasion.

Make sure to contact me after an absence to see what announcements or assignments you missed.  I recommend you ask a fellow student for a copy of their notes from that class to see what material we covered.

“Twenty percent of success is showing up…on time.”

—Robert Prince

Because coming late to class disrupts class, at times can force us to wait for you, and can mean missing important announcements, every three times you arrive late to class I will add one absence to your grade.  Redefine “on time” to class in your mind to mean “five minutes early.”  If you do arrive to class late, make sure to see me after class to make sure I mark you as present and let you know about any announcements I may have made that day.  If you forget to tell me you were late for class, you will receive an absence.

Here is how your absences will affect your final grade:

0 Absences (and zero tardies) = 110% for attendance (equals +2% extra credit)

Unexcused Absence = -10% from attendance grade per each

6+ Unexcused Absences = Automatically fail the course

Notes: 10%

You are required to take notes in this class.  Every two weeks I will ask to see everyone’s notes from the past lectures.  For each lecture I expect to see at least ½ page of notes.

Pop Quizzes: 5%

Cover the material in the course lectures.  If you miss a pop quiz, it can only be made up if your absence was excused and it must be made up before you return to class.  If you are late to class the day of a pop quiz, you cannot take it unless your tardy was excused.

Exams (2): 15% Each

Cover the material in the lectures.  They are not cumulative.

Basic Editing Assignment: 10%

Assemble a video that demonstrates your ability to do basic editing in AVID.

Final Project:  25%

            This will be a short video that demonstrates proficiency with the aesthetics and technology of non-linear editing.

 

Grading Guidelines:

A:  An honor grade that indicates originality and independent work, mastery of the subject and the satisfactory completion of more work than is regularly required.  To get an “A,” students in my classes need to impress me with the work they’ve done on an assignment and go well beyond what I asked for in the assignment.

94%-100% = A, 90%-93% = A-

 

B:  Indicates outstanding ability above the average level of performance.  To get a “B,” students in my classes need to do exactly what I asked for in the assignment and do it well.

87%-89% = B+, 84%-86% = B, 80%-83% = B-

 

IMPORTANT GRADING POLICY INFORMATION

 

Implications of the Grade of ‘C’ (and below) for letter-graded

undergraduate courses which are:

 

–Prerequisites for other courses, or

–Degree major requirements, or

–Core courses

 

C+ (2.3): Satisfactory to Fair: satisfactory level of performance, with some

mastery of material.

C (2.0): Average: satisfactory level of performance and level of competency

in the subject. A minimum grade of ‘C’ (2.0) is required for all

prerequisites and major courses.

C- (1.7): Barely satisfactory: Minimum grade required for all Core (X)

Courses. A grade of C- (1.7) in a class which is a prerequisite for another

class or in a class required for a student’s major will result in the

student being required to retake the class.

77%-79% = C+, 74%-76% = C, 70%-73% = C-

 

D+ (1.3); D (1.0); D- (0.7): Below Average: Fair to poor level of competency

in the subject matter.  A grade of D+, D or D- in a Core (X) class will

automatically require the student to retake the class to receive core

credit, starting Fall 2011.

67%-69% = D+, 64%-66% = D, 60%-63% = D-

 

F:  Indicates failure to meet lowest standards.  To get an “F,” students in my classes will have missed major elements of the assignment and/or the content will be all—or nearly all—poor quality.

0%-59% = F

 

For additional grading policy information, see the UAF Catalog.

 

Course Policies:

Late work or quizzes will be docked 15% plus an additional 15% for each class period that elapses after the due date.  Backup your work, reserve video equipment and work ahead of deadlines so you can avoid these problems.  If you miss the midterm exam, you will need documentation proving the legitimacy of your absence to avoid the 15% grade reduction.

 

Projects can be redone only if there is sufficient evidence that a requirement(s) of the assignment was described in a way that a reasonable adult would find confusing or ambiguous and that unclear element of the assignment directly related to the student’s reduced grade.  Not paying attention to the requirements of the assignment is not an excuse for doing the assignment improperly.

 

All work must comply with the University of Alaska Fairbanks policies on student conduct found online at www.uaf.edu/catalog/current/academics/regs3.html.

All work must be original productions for this course and plagiarism will result in a zero for the assignment, a possible F for the class, and potentially further academic discipline.  Ignorance of what it means to plagiarize will not be an excuse from punishment.  If you have questions about plagiarism, contact me before you hand in the assignment.

 

I will make reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities. Notify me within the first two weeks of the semester if you have any special needs.

 

Support Services:

I will make reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities, for example, providing an in-class note taker, providing a quiet and solitary test-taking environment, or other reasonable accommodations in line with your documented needs.  Disability services will provide you with documentary indicating what kind of assistance you need and, based on that evidence, I will implement that assistance to the best of my abilities. Notify me within the first two weeks of the semester if you have any special needs.

 

The departments listed below provide resources for students with disabilities, help writing papers, and help preparing for class presentations:

 

Disability Services

e-mail. fydso@uaf.edu

tel. 907-474-5655

tty. 907-474-1827

Whitaker Building Room 208

www.uaf.edu/disability

 

About Disability Services

At UAF Disability Services, our goal is to provide UAF students with access to academic classes and course materials through an interactive accommodation process.

UAF Disability Services provides accommodations to students on the Fairbanks campus as well as on the Bristol Bay, Chukchi, Interior Aleutians, Kuskokwim, Northwest, Community Technical College (CTC), Center For Distance Education (CDE), and College for Rural and Community Development (CRCD) campuses.

Students using community campuses or distance learning programs should contact Disability Services via telephone, fax, e-mail, U.S. postal mail, or in person to request and arrange for accommodations.

We enjoy supporting individuality, promoting independence and celebrating graduations.

 

Writing Center

Dept. Of English

801 Gruening Bldg.

(907) 474-7193

faengl@uaf.edu

 

The Writing Center is a student-staffed, student-oriented service of the English Department. Our tutors, English Department teaching assistants and a few outstanding undergraduate students, can assist you in all phases of the writing process, including the following:

 

  • Brainstorming and generating topics
  • Organizing ideas
  • Developing research strategies
  • Use of citation styles — MLA, APA, and Chicago
  • Editing for clarity and correctness

 

We collaborate with each student on a one-to-one basis, and we will work with students at any phase of the writing process — planning, drafting, revising. We can also help writers discover ways of improving grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.

Tutorials. Tutorial appointments at the Writing Center are 30 minutes long, and we encourage you to call or stop by to make an appointment. Walk-in sessions are often available, but in the last half of the semester we are often booked.

Fax Tutoring. We provide a fax tutoring service for students enrolled in the College of Rural and Community Development (CRCD). Students can fax their papers to us (1-800-478-5246), and they will have a telephone tutorial with a tutor at a designated time. We offer fax tutorials Monday through Thursday evenings and Sunday afternoons. Phone the Writing Center (907/474-5314) to make an appointment.

 

Speaking Center

Dept. of Communication

507 Greuning Bldg.

(907) 474-5470

fyspeak@uaf.edu

What is the Speaking Center?

The Speaking Center is a student-oriented service provided to facilitate preparing public presentations. Students can recieve coaching in refining their presentation topic, in organizing their presentation effectively, and in practicing their presentation. The Center makes it possible to digitally record and to watch one’s practice presentation, receiving constructive feed back from a Speaking Center coach.

 

Who can use the Speaking Center?

The Speaking center is available to all students currently enrolled at UAF or at TVC.

 

Scheduling Procedures

Please call 474-5470 or e-mail fyspeak@gmail.com to schedule an appointment at the Speaking Center. Walk-ins are welcome, however, students can be served only if there are openings.

Individuals may schedule the Center’s practice room daily any time prior to Speaking Center hours.

 

 

About Your Professor:

I grew up in East Lansing, Michigan and graduated from Calvin College with a B.A. in Telecommunications.  After college I went to work in Chicago for Kurtis Productions, producers of the Investigative Reports series on A&E.  I then was hired as a Producer/Director for the PBS affiliate in Grand Rapids, Michigan where I directed live and pre-recorded programs for local broadcast.  In 2000 I went back to Calvin to run the video production department.  While working there, I earned my M.A. from Michigan State University in Telecommunication, Information Studies and Media.

In 2005 I moved to Fairbanks to teach video production and documentary filmmaking in the Journalism Department at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

Want more video classes?  Check these out:

 

JRN F280 Video Storytelling (h)

3 Credits / Offered Fall / Prof. Prince

Basics of digital video production technology, composition, audio, lighting and editing as it relates to primarily non-fiction filmmaking. Students will conclude the course by producing their own short videos. Special fees apply. (Cross-listed with FLM F280.) (3+0)

 

JRN/FLM F292 Hands on Documentary Production

3 Credits / Maymester / Prof. Prince

Production of a short video documentary from start to finish on a subject to be announced. The class will work collectively to produce the film. Students will have the opportunity to work in various positions from director, producer, camera operator, sound, editing, etc. Special fees apply.  (Cross-listed with FLM F290.) (3+0)

 

JRN F480 Documentary Filmmaking (h)
3 Credits / Offered Spring / Prof. Prince
Basics of hands-on documentary filmmaking techniques, including preproduction, production and postproduction. Different documentary filmmaking directing styles and the process of distributing a documentary. Each student will produce a short documentary as the capstone of the course. Special fees apply. Prerequisites: JRN F280 or permission of instructor. (3+0)

 

 

How do I log on to Journalism Lab Computers?

  • If you’re sitting at the logon screen, click “Other” to login.
  • If “Other” is unavailable, wait 10-15 seconds and it will pop up.
  • Use your UA Credentials (UA Username & password) to log in.
  • You will be prompted to enter your UA Credentials again to mount your Lab Shares –  you can choose to do this or “cancel”.

“UA Credentials”? What’s that?

  • Your UA Username & password are used for a variety of services at UAF, including UAF email through Gmail, Blackboard & ELMO.
  • Not sure of your UA Credentials?  At the computer logon screen, use the “JRNLABS” account to log in.  Your instructor can provide you with the password.  This is a shared account and does not provide the privacy of your individual account BUT it provides you with the exact same access to all programs.  From here, use an Internet Browser to visit  https://elmo.alaska.edu to reset your password or Blackboard / UAF Email to “check” that the password you’re using is correct.
  • DO NOT continue to “guess” the password.  You will lock yourself out of your accounts which requires OIT to reset.  In most cases when students can’t login, it’s because they’ve forgotten their password is case sensitive or they’ve forgotten the password altogether.
  • Are you logged into your UA account but it looks different than other students? Contact Jason Lazarus in Bun 114 or at 474-6020.

“Lab Shares”? What’s that?

  • All UAF students have paid a Technology Fee that gives them limited shared space that’s accessible from all OIT labs on campus – and now that same space is accessible in Journalism Labs.
  • Are your UA Credentials not working for the Lab Shares logon?  Click “Cancel” and continue – you’ll still be able to use the computer.  Contact Jason Lazarus in Bun 114 or at 474-6020 for additional assistance.
  • Lab Shares provides you with space to save files and have them accessible throughout all lab machines – saving on the desktop ONLY saves on that specific computer’s desktop.
  • When mounted, Lab Shares will be accessible from the right side of your dock.

Journalism “ASIP” Server?

  • This is where you’ll save your assignments so your instructor can grade your class projects.  This is shared Server space where anyone can see your files – so only save project material – not sensitive information!
  • Once you’re logged on and you’ve got a file you need to turn in for an assignment, your instructor will provide you with logon information for a specific folder for your class – click on “ASIP” (located on the right side of your dock) and use that login information.   Once you’ve logged on, you’ll be able to find “News-FS” (or “Photo-FS” or “Art-FS, depending on your logon info) on the left side of any finder window.
  • If you’ve got files you want to work on that are on the server, ALWAYS click-and-drag them to the desktop and THEN open them.  Once done, save & click & drag them back onto the server.  This insures you’re working LOCALLY – which is much faster and doesn’t bog down the computer.

As always, Journalism is not responsible for lost files on Lab Shares, ASIP or individual computers.  Every student is expected to back up their own data on thumbdrives, USB hard drives or CD/DVDs.

Questions?  Contact Jason Lazarus in Room 114, or 474-6020, for further assistance!

 

DIGITAL VIDEO EDITING:

Tentative Course Schedule

 

 

Date: Subject: Assignment Due:

WEEK 1

INtroduction to the course

WEEK 2

EXPLORING THE INTERFACE & PREPARING TO EDIT

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 1

(CONT’D)

WEEK 3

(CONT’D)

 

ASSEMBLING A BASIC SEQUENCE

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 2

WEEK 4

(CONT’D)
(CONT’D)

WEEK 5

INGESTING FILE-BASED MEDIA

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 3

 

MANUAL TIMELINE EDITING

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 4

WEEK 6

(CONT’D)
REFINING THE EDIT

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 5

WEEK 7

(CONT’D)

 

 

REFINING & MIXING AUDIO

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 6

WEEK 8

CUSTOMIZING MEDIA COMPOSER

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 7

INTRODUCTION TO MULTICAMERA EDITING

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 8

WEEK 9

SPRING BREAK

 

WEEK 10

(cont’d)
CREATING QUICK TITLES & BASIC TRANSITIONS

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 9

WEEK 11

(cont’d)

 

PrePARING FOR OUTPUT AND EXPORTING A FILE

EDITING ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 10

WEEK 12

IN CLASS EDITING

 

IN CLASS EDITING

WEEK 13

VIEW PROJECTS

ASSIGNMENT #1:

BASIC EDITING

 

EXAM #1: avid Editing essentials

WEEK 14

INTRO TO AUDIO EFFECTS

EFFECTS ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 1

INTRO TO VIDEO EFFECTS

EFFECTS ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 2

WEEK 15

CORRECTIVE EFFECTS

EFFECTS ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 3

 

RETIMING

EFFECTS ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 4

WEEK 16

COLOR TREATING & CORRECTING

EFFECTS ESSENTIALS

CHAPTER 5

 

EXAM #2: AVID EFFECTS ESSENTIALS

 

FINAL EXAM

3:15 – 5:15 p.m., Thursday, May 9

Final Project

 

251 Television Production

JRN/FLM F251 F01 TELEVISION PRODUCTION

FALL 2011BUNNELL 122
MON/WED/FRI: 2:15PM-3:15PM
Prof. Robert Prince
Office: Bunnell 105C
E-mail: rob.prince@alaska.edu
Recommended (not required) Reading:
Television Production Handbook, 10th Ed. by Herbert Zettl
Course Description:
Television studio production, floor directing, audio, camera, staging, lighting and switching.
Course Goals:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be expected to have a working knowledge of how to technically produce a television newscast from start to finish.
Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Develop intermediate directing skills
2. Master the terms and directions used in studio production
3. Develop intermediate skills in all the studio production positions
Instructional Methods:
This course will be taught through lectures, class activities, and studio production work.
Journalism Lab Policies:
Welcome to the Journalism Labs! The following is a list of tips and guidelines for lab usage to insure that your experience in any of our labs goes smoothly and is highly productive. If you have any questions at all about the following, please either ask your instructor or our Computer Tech, Jason, available at Bunnell 102b, 474-6020 or fyjbtech@uaf.edu.
• First note that you’re working on Macintosh computers – if you’re not used to these types of computers, have limited computing skills, or are unfamiliar with OS X (the operating system), please inform the instructor of this so that extra help can be dispensed when needed.
• Each of the computers in our three labs are password protected with different passwords for each lab – Please request passwords from your instructor only. Do not give out these passwords to anyone.
• Many of you will opt to save your files on Thumbdrives (USB drives). These work great for
saving and transporting your work between home and school. But, unlike PC’s, Macs expect you to “eject” or “unmount’ your thumbdrive before you unattach it from your computer. Do so by dragging your thumbdrive from the desktop to the trash bin (which will change to an “eject” symbol). Not doing this can cause you to lose your information and possibly ruin the thumbdrive.
• Save and save often! You will be able to not only save on your computer but have several
other options to save your files – always use the default (saving to your computer) as well as one of the following secondary methods to insure you don’t lose your files. Your instructor will give you access to the Journalism file server which can be used for all your files (short of large video files and personal files). You can also use email to send files to yourself or use thumbdrives to carry your files home with you. Additionally, Lab 128 and 106 are fully equipped with CD/DVD burners and 126 has several CD/DVD burners as well. At any time your computer could crash and your files could be lost – save in at least one more location! Additionally, this insures that if someone is using “your” computer, you don’t have to wait for them to get off of it.
• New for Fall 2006, any student files meant to be saved at the end of class should be dragged and dropped onto the server as an additional place to save them– whenever you login to the computer, it’ll automatically mount the server shared drive, please make use of it! At any time during the semester, computers may fail and you may loose your files – keep two copies of them at all times – one on your computer and one on the server. Don’t forget to update these server files whenever you change the original! This, of coarse due to the size, does not apply to video students. Video students are expected to burn their work to DVD, transfer it to their own external hard drive or one provided by the department, or finish any projects before Friday – each Friday all the computers in 106 will be wiped.
• When you use the Journalism file server do NOT open your files directly off of the server!
Click and drag any of your files onto the desktop of the computer you are currently working on – not doing so bogs down the server and slows your work down too! When finished be sure to overwrite the old file on the server with the new version on your computer’s desktop!
• The files on your server may be available from your home computer – but do not expect that they will be. Due to security settings by OIT, your home computer may or may not be able to access files on the server from home. Consider this an additional place to save while at home, not a primary way to access your files.
• Do not abuse the computers. DCC as well as the Journalism Department monitors computer usage and will report improper use of departmental equipment. Treat these computers as if someone is watching your usage – because they are! Additionally, do not damage, hit, or take your frustrations out on any of our equipment. If you’re getting frustrated – walk away and take a break.
• Don’t leave any personal items in the labs after class. Once or twice a week each lab will be
cleaned and all personal items will be thrown away or placed in a lost and found.
• No food/drinks are allowed in 126 or 128. For Lab 106, please try to limit your food to the
tables.
• We have film scanners, flatbed scanners, DV/miniDV Decks, Minidisc Recorders and DV
Cameras available in our labs as well as for checkout. Please talk to your instructor about access to
any of these if you need them for a class project. Check out will be posted in the Journalism Office.
• Do not access highly personal items on these computers such as bank accounts and anything
dealing with your social security number. We have seen far too many people leave access to their
bank accounts open on lab machines far after they’ve left the room. Be vigilant!
• Most of all if you’re having any problems talk to your instructor or our Computer Tech, Jason.
We’re all more than willing to help you out with any problem! Jason is available quite a bit during
normal office hours – please consult his schedule on his door.
Building Access:
Access to the Journalism computer lab is virtually 24/7 with your Polar Express card. As long as you
can get into the Bunnell Building, you can access the lab. You can remain in the lab after the building
has closed. The lab is not open to students when classes are meeting in the lab. Those times will be
posted on the lab door. If you are in the lab when a class is about to begin, you will be asked to leave.
Note that some classes meet only occasionally in the lab and professors do their best to post those
times on the door in advance of the class meeting time.
Bunnell Building hours vary. Note that sometimes the south entrance by the Journalism Department
is locked while one or both of the north entrances are open, so try the other doors if you cannot enter
through the south entrance.
Expectations of Students:
1. Push yourself to do your best work for this class. If you don’t do your best work now, when will
you do it?
2. Arrive to class on time. Tardiness will result in a reduced grade (see “Attendance/Tardiness”
below).
3. Make sure your cell phones are OFF.
4. Laptops are allowed in class, however I reserve the right to close your laptop if I suspect you are
using it for non-class-related purposes regardless of whether or not I have evidence to support that
suspicion.
5. Come to class prepared, having completed the required homework and ready to participate in class
discussions.
6. Attend every class. Unexcused absences will results in a reduced grade (see
“Attendance/Tardiness” below).
7. Participate in every class.
8. Check your Blackboard e-mail every weekday.
9. Respect your peers. Support and encourage them and offer constructive criticism of their projects.
10. Ask questions during or after class when you do not understand something or are having a
problem. If you don’t understand something, chances are at least some of your peers don’t
understand it either.
11. If you are having a problem outside of class that is affecting your ability to perform in this class,
please let me know as soon as you can. You do not need to disclose the details of your situation.
Although doing well in college is very important and you need to work hard, do not let the
pressure overwhelm you. Your personal health and sanity are more important than good marks. I
consider myself a very easy person to talk to and encourage you to come speak to me if you need
to discuss issues course-related or otherwise.
Grading:
Attendance/Tardiness: 20%
I will allow you two unexcused absences for the entire semester before I begin lowering your
final grade with each additional absence. Each absence after the second will significantly reduce your
final grade. If you miss ten or more classes with no official documentation proving your absences
were legitimate, then you will fail the course REGARDLESS of if your other grades were high
enough to allow you to pass the course.
An excused absence is when you have notified me before class that you will not be able to
make it to class for a valid reason: sick, car trouble, family business, etc. You must notify me
BEFORE class for an absence to be excused. Telling me hours or days later why you missed class
will not excuse the absence. Treat this class like a job. If you don’t show up to work and don’t call in
beforehand, you get fired. The only exception to this rule is that I will accept a doctor’s note up to a
week after you return to class as an excuse for an absence.
Students who have zero absences (excused or unexcused) and no tardiness will receive 2%
extra credit in their final grade. An absence or tardy for any reason will remove this extra credit from
your final grade.
Although your absence from class may not directly count against your grade, any assignments
due that day that you did not turn in will still count against your grade. Make sure to contact me after
an absence to see what announcements or assignments you missed. I recommend you ask a fellow
student for a copy of their notes from that class to see what material we covered.
Because coming late to class disrupts class, at times forces us to wait for you, and can mean
missing important announcements, every three times you arrive to class late I will add one absence to
your grade. Redefine “on time” to class in your mind to mean “five minutes early.” If you do arrive
to class late, make sure to see me after class to make sure I mark you as present and let you know
about any announcements I may have made that day.
Here is how your unexcused absences will affect your final grade:
0 Absences (and zero tardiness) = 110% for attendance (equals +2% extra credit)
1-2 Unexcused Absences = No deduction from your attendance grade
3rd Unexcused Absences = 85% for attendance grade
4th Unexcused Absences = 70% for attendance grade
5th Unexcused Absences = 55% for attendance grade
6th Unexcused Absences = 40% for attendance grade
7th Unexcused Absences = 25% for attendance grade
8th Unexcused Absences = 10% for attendance grade
9th Unexcused Absences = 0% for attendance grade
10+ Unexcused Absences = Automatically fail the course
Midterm Exam: 20%
Multiple-choice, short answer, essay. Covers material from the lectures and exercises.
Quizzes: 5%
Cover material from recent lectures and exercises.
Interview Shoot 1: 5%
A studio shoot based on filming an interview.
Interview Shoot 2: 5%
A studio shoot based on filming an interview.
VO Package: 5%
A short voiceover package for the newscast.
News Shoot 1: 5%
A studio news shoot.
News Shoot 2: 10%
A studio news shoot.
News Shoot 3: 10%
A studio news shoot.
Final Newscast Evaluation: 15%
A final news shoot in which the class works as a whole to pull off a perfect newscast.
Grading Guidelines:
A: An honor grade that indicates originality and independent work, mastery of the subject and the
satisfactory completion of more work than was regularly required. To get an “A,” students in my
classes need to impress me with the work they’ve done on an assignment and go beyond what I asked
for in the assignment.
94%-100% = A, 90%-93% = AB:
Indicates outstanding ability above the average level of performance. To get a “B,” students in my
classes need to do exactly what I asked for in the assignment and do it well.
87%-89% = B+, 84%-86% = B, 80%-83% = BIMPORTANT
GRADING POLICY INFORMATION
Implications of the Grade of ‘C’ (and below) for letter-graded
undergraduate courses which are:
–Prerequisites for other courses, or
–Degree major requirements, or
–Core courses
C+ (2.3): Satisfactory to Fair: satisfactory level of performance, with some
mastery of material.
C (2.0): Average: satisfactory level of performance and level of competency
in the subject. A minimum grade of ‘C’ (2.0) is required for all
prerequisites and major courses.
C- (1.7): Barely satisfactory: Minimum grade required for all Core (X)
Courses. A grade of C- (1.7) in a class which is a prerequisite for another
class or in a class required for a student’s major will result in the
student being required to retake the class.
77%-79% = C+, 74%-76% = C, 70%-73% = CD+
(1.3); D (1.0); D- (0.7): Below Average: Fair to poor level of competency
in the subject matter. A grade of D+, D or D- in a Core (X) class will
automatically require the student to retake the class to receive core
credit, starting Fall 2011.
67%-69% = D+, 64%-66% = D, 60%-63% = DF:
Indicates failure to meet lowest standards. To get an “F,” students in my classes will have missed
several major elements of the assignment and the content will be all—or nearly all—poor quality.
0%-59% = F
For additional grading policy information see the UAF Catalog, pages 46-50.
Course Policies:
Late work or quizzes will be docked 15% plus an additional 15% for each class period it is not turned
in after the due date. Backup your work and work ahead of deadlines so you can avoid these
problems. If you miss the midterm exam, you will need documentation proving the legitimacy of
your absence to avoid the 15% grade reduction.
Projects can be redone only if there is sufficient evidence that a requirement(s) of the assignment was
described in a way that a reasonable adult would find confusing or ambiguous and that unclear
element of the assignment directly related to the student’s reduced grade.
All work must comply with the University of Alaska Fairbanks policies on student conduct found
online at www.uaf.edu/catalog/current/academics/regs3.html.
All work must be original productions for this course and plagiarism will result in a zero for the
assignment, a possible F for the class, and potentially further academic discipline. Ignorance of what
it means to plagiarize will not be an excuse from punishment. If you have questions about plagiarism,
contact me before you hand in the assignment.
Support Services:
I will make reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities. Notify me
within the first two weeks of the semester if you have any special needs.
The departments listed below provide resources for students with disabilities, help writing papers, and
help preparing for class presentations:
Disability Services
e-mail. fydso@uaf.edu
tel. 907-474-5655
tty. 907-474-1827
Whitaker Building Room
208
www.uaf.edu/disability
Writing Center
Dept. Of English
801 Gruening Bldg.
(907) 474-7193
faengl@uaf.edu
Speaking Center
Dept. of Communication
507 Greuning Bldg.
(907) 474-5470
fyspeak@uaf.edu
About Your Professor:
I grew up in East Lansing, Michigan and graduated from Calvin College with a B.A. in
Telecommunications. After college I went to work in Chicago for Kurtis Productions, producers of
the Investigative Reports series on A&E. I then was hired as a Producer/Director for the PBS affiliate
in Grand Rapids, Michigan where I directed live and pre-recorded programs for local broadcast. In
2000 I went back to Calvin to run the video production department. While working there I earned my
M.A. from Michigan State University in Telecommunication, Information Studies and Media.
In 2005 I moved to Fairbanks to teach video production and documentary filmmaking in the
Journalism Department at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Want more video classes? Check these out:
JRN F280 Video Storytelling (h)
3 Credits / Offered Fall / Prof. Prince
Basics of digital video production technology, composition, audio, lighting and editing as it relates to
primarily non-fiction filmmaking. Students will conclude the course by producing their own short
videos. Special fees apply. (Cross-listed with FLM F280.) (3+0)
JRN F290 Digital Video Editing
3 Credits / Offered As Demand Warrants / Prof. Prince
Introduction to the technical and aesthetic aspects of non-linear digital video editing. Students will go
from little or no experience in non-linear editing to being comfortable with some of the advanced
editing techniques. Address motion picture editing theories that are not bound to time or specific
editing technology. Special fees apply. (Cross-listed with FLM F290.) (3+0)
JRN F453 O Television News Reporting
3 Credits / Offered Spring / Prof. Prince
Electronic news gathering using videotape equipment, scriptwriting, location sound recording,
interview techniques, editing, videography and other aspects of field news reporting. Special fees
apply. Prerequisites: COMM F131X or COMM F141X; JRN F451; JRN F452. JRN F452 may be
taken concurrently with JRN F453. (2+2)
JRN F480 Documentary Filmmaking (h)
3 Credits / Offered Spring / Prof. Prince
Basics of hands-on documentary filmmaking techniques, including preproduction, production and
postproduction. Different documentary filmmaking directing styles and the process of distributing a
documentary. Each student will produce a short documentary as the capstone of the course. Special
fees apply. (3+0)
TELEVISION PRODUCTION: TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE
DATE: SUBJECT: NOTES:
SEPT. 2 INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
SEPT. 5 LABOR DAY—NO CLASSES
SEPT. 7 STUDIO POSITIONS
SEPT. 9 THE CAMERA MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
SEPT. 12 DIRECTING TERMS
SEPT. 14 THE SWITCHER MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
SEPT. 16 STUDIO SHOOT MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
SEPT. 19 AUDIO MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
SEPT. 21 AUDIO CONTINUED MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
SEPT. 23 STUDIO SHOOT MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
SEPT. 26 DIRECTING
SEPT. 28 INTERVIEW #1 REHERSAL MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
SEPT. 30 INTERVIEW SHOOT #1 MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
INTERVIEW #1 GRADED
OCT. 3 INTERVIEW TECHNIQUES
OCT. 5 INTERVIEW #2 REHERSAL MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
OCT. 7 INTERVIEW SHOOT #2 MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
INTERVIEW #2 GRADED
OCT. 10 TELEPROMPTER MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
OCT. 12 RUNDOWNS
OCT. 14 STUDIO SHOOT MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
OCT. 17 VTR’S & CCU’S
OCT. 19 REVIEW FOR MIDTERM
OCT. 21 MIDTERM EXAM
OCT. 24 FIELD PRODUCTION
OCT. 26 FIELD PRODUCTION EXERCISE
OCT. 28 VIEW RAW VO FOOTAGE VO PACKAGE RAW
OCT. 31 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL VIDEO EDITING
NOV. 2 EDITING CONTINUED
NOV. 4 IN CLASS EDITING PERIOD
NOV. 7 STUDIO NEWS SHOOT REHEARSAL MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
NOV. 9 STUDIO NEWS SHOOT REHEARSAL MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
NOV. 11 STUDIO NEWS SHOOT #1 MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
NEWS SHOOT #1 GRADED
NOV. 14 VIEW PACKAGES VO PACKAGE
NOV. 16 STUDIO NEWS SHOOT REHEARSAL MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
NOV. 18 STUDIO NEWS SHOOT #2 MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
NEWS SHOOT #2 GRADED
NOV. 21 PRODUCING
NOV. 23 VIDEO CABLES / SIGNALS
NOV. 25 THANKSGIVING BREAK—NO CLASS
NOV. 28 INTERVIEWING
NOV. 30 STUDIO NEWS SHOOT REHEARSAL MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
DEC. 2 STUDIO NEWS SHOOT #3 MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
NEWS SHOOT #3 GRADED
DEC. 5 IN CLASS EDITING PERIOD
DEC. 7 IN CLASS EDITING PERIOD
DEC. 9 VIEW FINAL PACKAGES FINAL PACKAGE DUE
DEC. 12 REHEARSE FINAL NEWS SHOOT MEET IN MINOR STUDIO
DEC. 16 1:00PM – 3:00PM FINAL NEWS SHOOT MEET IN MINOR STUDIO

280 Video Storytelling

JRN/FLM F280 F01

Video Storytelling

Fall 2012

Bunnell 126

tuesday/thursday 11:30am-1:00pm

Prof. Robert Prince

Office: Bunnell 105C

Email: rob.prince@alaska.edu

 Required Reading:

Visual Storytelling, Osgood & Hinshaw, 2009

Course Description:

JRN F280 Video Storytelling (h)

3 Credits
Offered Fall

Basics of digital video production technology, composition, audio, lighting and editing as it relates to primarily non-fiction filmmaking. Students will conclude the course by producing their own short videos. Special fees apply. Cross-listed with FLM F280. (3+0)

Course Goals:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be expected to have a basic knowledge of how to technically and artfully produce short, non-fiction videos.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Capture attractive video images with useable audio
  2. Do basic non-linear editing in Final Cut Xpress
  3. Tell a good story using moving images and audio

Instructional Methods:

This course will be taught through lectures, class activities, and field production work.

 

Expectations of Students:

  1. Push yourself to do your best work for this class.  If you don’t do your best work now, when will you do it?  Remember who writes your recommendation letters.
  2. Arrive to class on time.  Tardiness will result in a reduced grade (see “Attendance/Tardiness” below) and may prevent you from taking quizzes.
  3. Make sure your cell phones are on silent.
  4. Laptops are allowed in class, however I reserve the right to close your laptop if I suspect you are using it for non-class-related purposes regardless of whether or not I have evidence to support that suspicion.
  5. Come to class prepared, having completed the required homework and ready to participate in class discussions.
  6. Attend every class.  Unexcused absences will results in a reduced grade (see “Attendance/Tardiness” below).
  7. Participate in every class.
  8. Check your Blackboard e-mail every weekday.
  9. Respect your peers.  Support and encourage them and offer constructive criticism of their projects.
  10. Ask questions during or after class when you do not understand something or are having a problem.  If you don’t understand something, chances are at least some of your peers don’t understand it either.
  11. Take notes.
  12. If you are having a problem outside of class that is affecting your ability to perform in this class, please let me know as soon as you can.  You do not need to disclose the details of your situation.  Although doing well in college is very important and you need to work hard, do not let the pressure overwhelm you.  Your personal health and sanity are more important than good marks.  I consider myself a very easy person to talk to and encourage you to come speak to me if you need to discuss issues course-related or otherwise.

 

Equipment Policies

Productions for this class will be all digital using Macs for the editing in this class. We will use Panasonic AG-HMC40 HD cameras for recording.  Access to the computers is on a first come, first serve basis.  Access to the editing room is available virtually 24-7.  You will need permission from us to have security let you in the building during the very late evening/holidays.

 

Cameras must be checked out and returned through the student equipment manager, the department administrator, Jason Lazarus or Robert Prince.  The Monday-Friday hours when you can do that will be announced as soon as possible.  We recommend that you reserve equipment well in advance of when you need it.  Cameras can be checked out for only one evening or the weekend. You have to sign a waiver before you can check out any equipment.  Cameras and editing equipment are also available for check out through the Rasmuson library.

The hard drives on the lab computers will be erased every Friday afternoon to prevent the buildup of excessive files on the drives.  If you need an exception from this, make sure to let Jason Lazarus or me know.

Building Access:

Access to the Journalism computer lab is virtually 24/7 with your Polar Express card.  As long as you can get into the Bunnell Building, you can access the lab.  You can remain in the lab after the building has closed.  The lab is not open to students when classes are meeting in the lab.  Those times will be posted on the lab door.  If you are in the lab when a class is about to begin, you will be asked to leave.  Note that some classes meet only occasionally in the lab and professors do their best to post those times on the door in advance of the class meeting time.

Bunnell Building hours vary.  Note that sometimes the south entrance by the Journalism Department is locked while one or both of the north entrances by the flags are open, so try the other doors if you cannot enter through the south entrance.

Final Grade Breakdown:

Attendance: 20%

“Eighty percent of success is showing up.”

—Woody Allen

Each unexcused absence in this class will reduce your final grade.  If you have six or more unexcused absences, then you will automatically fail the course REGARDLESS of if your other grades were high enough to allow you to pass the course.

Excused absences will not affect your attendance grade (though you will lose the extra credit).  An excused absence is when you have notified me before class that you will not be able to make it to class for a valid reason: sick, personal emergency, etc.  “I’m too busy” or “I can’t find a ride to class” are not valid reasons for missing class.

You must notify me BEFORE class for an absence to be excused.  Telling me hours or days later why you missed class will not excuse the absence.  Treat this class like a job.  If you don’t show up to work and don’t call in, you get fired.  The only exception to this rule is that I will accept a doctor’s note up to a week after you return to class as an excuse for an absence.

Students who have zero absences (excused or unexcused) and no tardies will receive extra credit in their final grade.  Any absence or tardy for any reason will remove this extra credit.

Make sure to contact me after an absence to see what announcements or assignments you missed.  I recommend you ask a fellow student for a copy of their notes from that class to see what material we covered.

“Twenty percent of success is showing up…on time.”

—Robert Prince

Because coming late to class disrupts class, at times can force us to wait for you, and can mean missing important announcements, every three times you arrive late to class I will add one absence to your grade.  Redefine “on time” to class in your mind to mean “five minutes early.”  If you do arrive to class late, make sure to see me after class to make sure I mark you as present and let you know about any announcements I may have made that day.

Here is how your absences will affect your final grade:

0 Absences (and zero tardies) = 110% for attendance (equals +2% extra credit)

Unexcused Absence = -10% from attendance grade per each

6+ Unexcused Absences = Automatically fail the course

Pop Quizzes: 5%

Cover the material in the course lectures and readings.  If you miss a pop quiz, it can only be made up if your absence was excused and it must be made up before you return to class.  If you are late to class the day of a pop quiz, you cannot take it unless your tardy was excused.

Exam: 25%

Covers the readings and lectures.

Production Assignment Basic Camerawork: 5%

Covers the basic composition skills.

Production Assignment Intermediate Camerawork: 5%

Covers intermediate composition skills.

Production Assignment Lighting: 5%

Covers the basics of three-point lighting.

Production Assignment Audio: 5%

Covers the basics of recording quality audio for video and using audio in storytelling.

Production Assignment Editing: 5%

Covers the basics of editing on Final Cut Pro.

Final Project: 25%

A short 3-5 minute video that demonstrates a cumulative knowledge of the subjects covered in the course.

 

Grading Guidelines:

A:  An honor grade that indicates originality and independent work, mastery of the subject and the satisfactory completion of more work than was regularly required.  To get an “A,” students in my classes need to impress me with the work they’ve done on an assignment and go beyond what I asked for in the assignment.

94%-100% = A, 90%-93% = A-

B:  Indicates outstanding ability above the average level of performance.  To get a “B,” students in my classes need to do exactly what I asked for in the assignment and do it well.

87%-89% = B+, 84%-86% = B, 80%-83% = B-

IMPORTANT GRADING POLICY INFORMATION

Implications of the Grade of ‘C’ (and below) for letter-graded

undergraduate courses which are:

–Prerequisites for other courses, or

–Degree major requirements, or

–Core courses

C+ (2.3): Satisfactory to Fair: satisfactory level of performance, with some

mastery of material.

C (2.0): Average: satisfactory level of performance and level of competency

in the subject. A minimum grade of ‘C’ (2.0) is required for all

prerequisites and major courses.

C- (1.7): Barely satisfactory: Minimum grade required for all Core (X)

Courses. A grade of C- (1.7) in a class which is a prerequisite for another

class or in a class required for a student’s major will result in the

student being required to retake the class.

77%-79% = C+, 74%-76% = C, 70%-73% = C-

D+ (1.3); D (1.0); D- (0.7): Below Average: Fair to poor level of competency

in the subject matter.  A grade of D+, D or D- in a Core (X) class will

automatically require the student to retake the class to receive core

credit, starting Fall 2011.

67%-69% = D+, 64%-66% = D, 60%-63% = D-

 

F:  Indicates failure to meet lowest standards.  To get an “F,” students in my classes will have missed major elements of the assignment and/or the content will be all—or nearly all—poor quality.

0%-59% = F

For additional grading policy information, see the UAF Catalog, pages 46-50.

Course Policies:

Late work or quizzes will be docked 15% plus an additional 15% for each class period it is not turned in after the due date.  Backup your work, reserve video equipment, and work ahead of deadlines so you can avoid these problems.  If you miss the midterm exam, you will need documentation proving the legitimacy of your absence to avoid the 15% grade reduction.

Projects can be redone only if there is sufficient evidence that a requirement(s) of the assignment was described in a way that a reasonable adult would find confusing or ambiguous and that unclear element of the assignment directly related to the student’s reduced grade.

All work must comply with the University of Alaska Fairbanks policies on student conduct found online at www.uaf.edu/catalog/current/academics/regs3.html.

All work must be original productions for this course and plagiarism will result in a zero for the assignment, a possible F for the class, and potentially further academic discipline.  Ignorance of what it means to plagiarize will not be an excuse from punishment.  If you have questions about plagiarism, contact me before you hand in the assignment.

I will make reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities. Notify me within the first two weeks of the semester if you have any special needs.

Support Services:

I will make reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities, for example, providing an in-class note taker, providing a quiet and solitary test-taking environment, or other reasonable accommodations in line with your documented needs.  Disability services will provide you with documentary indicating what kind of assistance you need and, based on that evidence, I will implement that assistance to the best of my abilities. Notify me within the first two weeks of the semester if you have any special needs.

The departments listed below provide resources for students with disabilities, help writing papers, and help preparing for class presentations:

Disability Services

e-mail. fydso@uaf.edu

tel. 907-474-5655

tty. 907-474-1827

Whitaker Building Room 208

www.uaf.edu/disability

About Disability Services

At UAF Disability Services, our goal is to provide UAF students with access to academic classes and course materials through an interactive accommodation process.

UAF Disability Services provides accommodations to students on the Fairbanks campus as well as on the Bristol Bay, Chukchi, Interior Aleutians, Kuskokwim, Northwest, Community Technical College (CTC), Center For Distance Education (CDE), and College for Rural and Community Development (CRCD) campuses.

Students using community campuses or distance learning programs should contact Disability Services via telephone, fax, e-mail, U.S. postal mail, or in person to request and arrange for accommodations.

We enjoy supporting individuality, promoting independence and celebrating graduations.

Writing Center

Dept. Of English

801 Gruening Bldg.

(907) 474-7193

faengl@uaf.edu

The Writing Center is a student-staffed, student-oriented service of the English Department. Our tutors, English Department teaching assistants and a few outstanding undergraduate students, can assist you in all phases of the writing process, including the following:

  • Brainstorming and generating topics
  • Organizing ideas
  • Developing research strategies
  • Use of citation styles — MLA, APA, and Chicago
  • Editing for clarity and correctness

We collaborate with each student on a one-to-one basis, and we will work with students at any phase of the writing process — planning, drafting, revising. We can also help writers discover ways of improving grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.

Tutorials. Tutorial appointments at the Writing Center are 30 minutes long, and we encourage you to call or stop by to make an appointment. Walk-in sessions are often available, but in the last half of the semester we are often booked.

Fax Tutoring. We provide a fax tutoring service for students enrolled in the College of Rural and Community Development (CRCD). Students can fax their papers to us (1-800-478-5246), and they will have a telephone tutorial with a tutor at a designated time. We offer fax tutorials Monday through Thursday evenings and Sunday afternoons. Phone the Writing Center (907/474-5314) to make an appointment.

 

Speaking Center

Dept. of Communication

507 Greuning Bldg.

(907) 474-5470

fyspeak@uaf.edu

What is the Speaking Center?

The Speaking Center is a student-oriented service provided to facilitate preparing public presentations. Students can recieve coaching in refining their presentation topic, in organizing their presentation effectively, and in practicing their presentation. The Center makes it possible to digitally record and to watch one’s practice presentation, receiving constructive feed back from a Speaking Center coach.

 

Who can use the Speaking Center?

The Speaking center is available to all students currently enrolled at UAF or at TVC.

 

Scheduling Procedures

Please call 474-5470 or e-mail fyspeak@gmail.com to schedule an appointment at the Speaking Center. Walk-ins are welcome, however, students can be served only if there are openings.

Individuals may schedule the Center’s practice room daily any time prior to Speaking Center hours.

About Your Professor:

I grew up in East Lansing, Michigan and graduated from Calvin College with a B.A. in Telecommunications.  After college I went to work in Chicago for Kurtis Productions, producers of the Investigative Reports series on A&E.  I then was hired as a Producer/Director for the PBS affiliate in Grand Rapids, Michigan where I directed live and pre-recorded programs for local broadcast.  In 2000 I went back to Calvin to run the video production department.  While working there I earned my M.A. from Michigan State University in Telecommunication, Information Studies and Media.

In 2005 I moved to Fairbanks to teach video production and documentary filmmaking in the Journalism Department at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

  

Want more video classes?  Check these out:

 

JRN/FLM F290 Digital Video Editing

3 Credits / Offered As Demand Warrants / Prof. Prince

Introduction to the technical and aesthetic aspects of non-linear digital video editing. Students will go from little or no experience in non-linear editing to being comfortable with some of the advanced editing techniques. Address motion picture editing theories that are not bound to time or specific editing technology. Special fees apply. (Cross-listed with FLM F290.) (3+0

JRN/FLM F292 Hands on Documentary Production

3 Credits / MAYmester / Prof. Prince

Production of a short video documentary from start to finish on a subject to be announced. The class will work collectively to produce the film. Students will have the opportunity to work in various positions from director, producer, camera operator, sound, editing, etc. Special fees apply.  (Cross-listed with FLM F290.) (3+0)

JRN/FLM F480 Documentary Filmmaking (h)
3 Credits / Offered Spring / Prof. Prince
Basics of hands-on documentary filmmaking techniques, including preproduction, production and postproduction. Different documentary filmmaking directing styles and the process of distributing a documentary. Each student will produce a short documentary as the capstone of the course. Special fees apply. Prerequisites: JRN F280 or permission of instructor. (3+0) 

VIDEO STORYTELLING: Tentative Course Schedule

Date: Subject: Assignment Due:

8/30

Introduction to the course

9/4

Camera Controls / Tripods

9/6

Guts of a Video Camera Chapter 4: From Light to Electrical Energy

9/11

Camera Specs

9/13

Video Cables  

9/18

View Projects Production Assignment:  Basic Camerawork

9/20

Composition Chapter 5: Composition

9/25

Composition Activity  

9/27

Composition Activity  

10/2

View Projects Production Assignment:  Intermediate Camerawork

10/4

Lighting & White Balance Chapter 7: Lighting in the Field

10/9

Lighting Continued

10/11

Lighting Activity  

10/16

View Projects / audio SET-UP Production Assignment: Lighting

10/18

Audio RECODING Chapter 6: Audio in the Field

10/23

View Projects Production Assignment:  Audio

10/25

Editing as storytelling Chapter 8: The Aesthetics of Editing

10/30

Introduction to Editing Chapter 9: Post Production

11/1

Editing Continued

11/6

Editing Continued

11/8

Graphics & Effects Chapter 11: Graphics & Effects

11/13

In-class editing period  

11/15

In-class editing period  

11/20

View Projects Production Assignment:  Editing

11/22

Thanksgiving Break – No Class

11/27

Final Project Discussion / Exam Review

11/29

Exam

12/4

View Raw Footage Raw Footage for Final Project

12/6

In-class editing period  

12/13

Final Exam Period 10:15am-12:15pm View final projects

 

Nickel and Dimed

Nickel and Dimed poster“Nickel and Dimed”

by Joan Holden, based on the 2001 book of the same title by Barbara Ehrenreich

Directed by Brian EG Cook

October 25 – November 9, 2013*
Extended due to popular demand!

Click on any image for a larger view.

Following the Sunday, Oct 27 matinee, audience members and the general public were invited to a panel discussion about minimum wage issues, moderated by Cook. The panel included professors from the University’s departments of sociology and psychology, and the School of Management, as well as an academic advisor from the Office of Student Support Services, and the director of the local food bank.

News article

The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner featured an article on the production!

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner review of "Nickel and Dimed"

The official Fairbanks Daily News-Miner review.

Cast:
Rachel Blackwell Barbara
Melissa Buchta Woman, Daughter, Customer, Carlie, Marge, Patient 3, Lady
Daniels Gail, Maddy, Patient 4, Mom
Nicole Cowans Nita, Server 1, Hector, Rich Lady, Patient 1, Melissa
Ian Hendren George, Man, Boyfriend, Stock-boy, Pete, Timid Man
Marley Horner Editor, Philip, Customer, Ted, Howard
Katrina Kuharich Server 2, Joan, Holly, Social Worker, Sari
Nancy Nguyen Teenager, Manager, Cashier, Customer, Nan, Patient 2, Kim
Production Team:
Director: Brian EG Cook
Set, Lighting & Sound Designer: Kade Mendelowitz
Costume Designer: Bethany Marx
Assistant Director: Mary Ludolph
Stage Manager: Steve Keller